FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE

 

April 24, 1991

 

Release # 91-060

 

Stop Using "Bark Buster" Auger Type Log Splitters Safety Commission Warns Consumers

WASHINGTON, DC---Government safety experts are warning consumers to stop using "Bark Buster" brand auger-type log splitters manufactured from 1977 through 1988 because of the risk of serious injury or death due to entrapment of hands, arms and legs. These log splitters were sold nationwide for use in splitting firewood.

The U.S. Consumer Product Safety Commission (CPSC) said there have been at least four serious injuries and one death to users of these log splitters. The injuries involved the loss of arms, legs or fingers. The CPSC originally learned of this unsafe product from a consumer complaint.

These log splitters were manufactured by F. W. & Associates, Inc., Diversified Industries, Inc., Bark Buster, Inc., Isanti Engineering, Inc. and sold under the "Bark Buster" brand. They were also manufactured in gasoline engine powered, tractor engine powered and motor vehicle rear wheel powered models.

The CPSC believes this serious hazard exists because these log splitters lack the following features:

  1. There is no operator accessible off/on switch.
  2. There is no "dead-man" feature provided to assure the auger stops if the operator loses control of the operations.
  3. No guard is present on the auger to prevent operator entrapment.

Owners of these log splitters are urged to take measures which will make the units unuseable by unbolting, removing and discarding the auger tip assembly.

These devices are no longer being made by the most recent manufacturer, Isanti Engineering, Inc., Isanti, MN. The CPSC estimates about 8,000 units were manufactured.

The CPSC is issuing this warning as part of its mission to protect the public from unreasonable risks of injury and death associated with consumer products. The CPSC is the Federal agency responsible for product safety. Some 15,000 types of products fall within the Commission's jurisdiction and each year these products are involved in an estimated 29 million injuries and 22,000 deaths.