FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE  
December 3, 1981  
Release # 81-029

WASHINGTON, D.C. ( Dec. 3 ) -- Three firms today alerted consumers that approximately four million plastic table lamps if misused or carelessly handled may pose a risk of eIectrocution or electrical shock.

The warning was issued voluntarily in cooperation with the U.S. Consumer Product Safety Commission by A-Bee Syndicate, Inc., of New York, New York; B & D Molded Products, Inc., of Shelton, Connecticut; and Injection Corporation, of Plainfield, New Jersey. CPSC staff has identified these companies as manufacturers and distributors of the lamps according to definitions in the Consumer Product Safety Act.

According to the firms, the lamps were designed and manufactured in conformity with existing industry practices. They could, however, pose a potential safety hazard if the lightbulb socket is dislodged or removed from the lamp base, thereby exposing two electrical terminals positioned on either side of the socket.

The lamps consist of a black plastic base with three legs which supports a plastic shade covered with bubble-like protrusions. The shades were produced in three colors: white, lime-green and neon-orange. The lamps stand approximately 16 inches tall, and some were made with the name "A-Bee" on the smooth collar at the base of the shade.

The lamps were sold nationwide for approximately $1 each in variety retail stores from 1965 through 1975, although the majority were distributed in the eastern half of the U.S. Some lamps may have been given away as promotional items.

Consumers who own one of the lamps should take the following steps to determine if there is a safety hazard:

- Unplug the lamp;

- Remove the shade and turn the lamp upside down;

- Throw the lamp away if the bulb socket falls out of the base or is loose enough to expose the electrical terminals.

Anyone requiring additional information about this warning should contact CPSC's toll-free Hotline at 800-638-2772.

Warning
Lamps

Certain of the pictured table lamps may contain a potential electrocution or shock hazard. Each lamp consists of a black, plastic three-legged base supporting a plastic shade covered with bubble-like protrusions. The shades are available in white, neon-orange, and lime-green. The lamps were distributed from 1965 through April 1975 and sold for approximately $1.00. The lamps may often be identified through the name "A-BEE" which may be visible on the smooth collar on the base of the lamp's shade.  

If the lamp is titled or tipped, the bulb socket may dislodge from the lamp's base, thereby exposing two copper electrical terminals.

Consumers should check to see if their lamp is one affected by talking the following steps:

  • Unplug the Lamp
  • Remove the shade from the lamp's base
  • Turn the lamp upside down

If a bulb socket works itself loose or falls out exposing the electrical terminals, the lamp should not be used.

Lamps

In certain of the affected table lamps, the bulb socket may not be securely fastened to the lamp's base or may have been able to work itself loose from the lamp's base.   Consumers owning one of the affected lamps are warned to immediately stop use of the lamp and remove it form children's access.