FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE

 

October 14, 1976

 

Release # 76-068


WASHINGTON, D.C. (Oct. 14) -- The U.S. Consumer Product Safety Commission (CPSC), in cooperation with the importers involved, announced today the recall of two brands of imported baby pacifiers that may pose a substantial product hazard.

The pacifiers, imported from Spain and known as Chupetes in Spanish, were marketed under the names DOLAX and OLLA and sold for about 45 cents each.

The DOLAX pacifiers were usually sold in individual plastic bubble packs with the words "Pacifier DOLAX Chupetes" across the top of each container. The pacifiers are approximately two inches long with a one- inch soft rubber nipple and a flexible plastic saucer-shaped shield about l-1/2 inches in diameter at the base of the nipple. The handle of the pacifier is in the shape of a ring and was sold with a removable plastic bow tied to it. About 306,792 DOLAX pacifiers have been marketed, chiefly in the area of New York, New Jersey, Puerto Rico and Chicago.

The OLLA pacifiers also were sold in individual plastic bags with a picture of an infant on the package and the name of the brand, OLLA, in large letters across the front of the bag. They are approximately two inches long with a one-inch soft rubber nipple and a flexible plastic saucer-shaped shield at the base. The shield is about 1-1/2 inches in diameter. The handle of the pacifier is in the shape of an animal head and about 119,568 OLIA pacifiers have been marketed, mostly in the areas of New York, New Jersey, Illinois, Florida and Washington, D.C.

Consumers who suspect that they may have purchased one of these pacifiers should remove it immediately from the child's possession and return it to the place of purchase for a refund. For further information, consumers may call the Consumer Product Safety Commission's toll-free hotline at 800/638-2772.

Recognizing there may be a substantial risk if infants suffocate from accidental ingestions of the pacifiers, CPSC next week will publish in the Federal Register its proposed regulation to require that pacifier shields be large enough so that they cannot enter the baby's mouth.

The Commission has conducted indepth investigations that indicate that from 1970 through 1975 at least eight deaths have been associated with pacifiers.

This press release is available in Spanish through the Office of Public Affairs.