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The New Crib Standard: Questions and Answers

Earlier Version: March 4, 2011
Updated: July 15, 2011, Jan. 3, 2013

Since CPSC approved a new crib rule, your questions have been flowing into us. While most questions have revolved around the drop side, it’s important for you to know that the new standard affects far more than the drop side. A crib’s mattress support, slats, and hardware are now required to be more durable and manufacturers will have to test to new more stringent requirements to prove compliance.

Here are some of your questions along with answers:

General Questions | Consumers | Child Care Centers, Foster Homes, Churches, Hospitals | Manufacturers, Importers, Retailers | Retrofitting Cribs | Crib Warranties

GENERAL QUESTIONS

5 New Federal Requirements for Cribs

Click on the poster to print the 5 new federal requirements for cribs.

 

  • What is the new standard for cribs?Beginning June 28, 2011, all cribs manufactured and sold (including resale) must comply with new and improved federal safety standards. The new rules, which apply to full-size and non full-size cribs, prohibit the manufacture or sale of traditional drop-side rail cribs, strengthen crib slats and mattress supports, improve the quality of hardware and require more rigorous testing. The details of the rule are available on CPSC’s website at www.cpsc.gov/businfo/frnotices/fr11/cribfinal.pdf.

    The new rules also apply to cribs currently in use at child care centers and places of public accommodation. By December 28, 2012, these facilities must use only compliant cribs that meet the new federal safety standards.

  • What if I need to purchase a new crib prior to June 28, 2011?Some compliant cribs may be available before the required date. However, you will not be able tell if the crib is compliant by looking at the crib. So, you may want to ask the retail store or the manufacturer whether the crib complies with 16 CFR 1219, the new federal standard for full-size cribs or with 16 CFR 1220, the new federal standard for non-full-size cribs.
  • Is this new regulation simply a ban on all drop-side rail cribs?No, these are sweeping new safety rules that will bring a safer generation of cribs to the marketplace in 2011. CPSC’s new crib standards address many factors related to crib safety in addition to the drop-side rail. A crib’s mattress support, slats, and hardware are now required to be more durable and manufacturers will have to test to the new more stringent requirements to prove compliance.
  • Are all drop-side rail cribs “recalled” because of the new regulation?There has not been a specific “recall” of all drop-side cribs due to the new regulation. Instead, some manufacturers recently have recalled their cribs in cooperation with the CPSC because a specific defect or risk of harm has been discovered relating to a particular crib. Although these recalls are separate from CPSC’s new crib standards, traditional drop-side cribs will not meet the new crib standards that became effective on June 28, 2011, and cribs with traditional drop-sides cannot be sold after that date.
  • How do I know whether the specific crib that I own/use in my child care facility meets the new standards?You cannot tell from looking at a crib whether it meets the new standards. It is not likely that cribs in use before the Commission issued its crib rule in December 2010 will comply with the new standards. If you are considering purchasing new cribs that meet the standards, you may want to ask the manufacturer or retailer whether the crib complies with 16 CFR 1219 (the new standard for full-size cribs) or 16 CFR 1220 (the new standard for non-full-size cribs). Manufacturers are required to test samples of their cribs to the new standards and to certify that they comply with the new standards. They must provide this certification to the retailer.

    You can ask the manufacturer or retailer for a copy of the certificate of compliance that should indicate that the crib is certified to meet 16 CFR 1219 or 16 CFR 1220. Beginning June 28, 2011, all cribs manufactured or offered for sale, lease, or resale are required to meet the new crib standards.

  • Who will be enforcing the crib standards and what are the penalties for using cribs that do not meet the new standards?CPSC will be the main agency enforcing the new crib standards. The initial focus will be on manufacturers and retailers since they must comply with the new standards by June 28, 2011. Anyone who is covered by the new crib standards and does not comply commits a prohibited act under section 19(a)(1) of the Consumer Product Safety Act (CPSA). A person or company that knowingly commits a prohibited act is subject to possible civil penalties. States’ attorneys general also have authority to enforce the crib standards through injunctions.

 

CONSUMERS

 

  • As a consumer, what can I do if I have a drop-side crib?Some drop-side crib manufacturers have immobilizers that fit their cribs. Drop-side crib immobilizers are devices that are used to secure drop sides to prevent dangerous situations in which the drop-side either partially or fully separates from the crib. As part of a recall, CPSC staff works with companies to provide fixes, or remedies, for products. For drop-side cribs, that remedy has been immobilizers.

    Check the CPSC’s website for companies that have recalled their cribs and are providing immobilizers to secure the drop-side on the cribs. These immobilizers were evaluated and approved by CPSC staff for use with these particular drop-side cribs.

    If your drop-side crib has not been recalled, you can call the manufacturer and ask if they are making an immobilizer for your crib. Remember, though, that those particular immobilizers have not been tested or evaluated by CPSC staff for use with your specific crib.

    Note that a drop side crib, even with an immobilizer installed, will not meet the new CPSC crib standards.

  • Is a sturdy, non drop-side crib okay for a consumer to use?It is unlikely that your current crib will meet the new crib standards. The new standards require stronger hardware and rigorous testing to prove a crib’s durability. If you continue to use your current crib, you are encouraged to check the crib frequently to make sure that all hardware is secured tightly and that there are no loose, missing, or broken parts. Note that after December 28, 2012, child care facilities, family child care homes, and places of public accommodations, such as hotels and motels, must provide cribs that comply with the new and improved standards.
  • My drop-side crib has not been recalled, but I am worried about using it with my baby. Can I return it for a refund?Manufacturers and retailers are not required to accept returned drop-side cribs or to provide a refund if the crib has not been recalled.
  • Is it okay for me as a consumer to resell, donate or give away a crib that does not meet the new crib standards?A consumer should not resell, donate or give away a crib that does not meet the new crib standards, such as trying to resell the product through an online auction site or donating to a local thrift store. CPSC recommends disassembling the crib before discarding it.
  • Is the answer different if a piece (“immobilizer”) has been added to my drop-side crib to prevent the side from moving up and down?Consumers should not sell or give away a drop-side crib that has an added immobilizer because it still will not meet the new crib standards.
  • If I am unable to purchase a new crib, what can I do to keep my baby safe?If you continue to use your current crib, you are encouraged to:
        a. Check CPSC’s crib recall list to make sure that your crib has not been recalled.
        b. Check the crib frequently to make sure all of the hardware is secured tightly and that there are no loose, missing, or broken parts.
        c. If your crib has a drop-side rail, stop using that drop-side function. If the crib has been recalled, request a free immobilizer from the manufacturer or retailer (particular immobilizer will vary depending on the crib).
      d. Another option is to use a portable play yard, so long as it is not a model that has been recalled previously.

 

  • If a customer purchased a crib that was manufactured before June 28, 2011, but they return the crib for a warranty claim after June 28, 2011, must the replacement crib meet the new crib standards?

 

Yes. When a manufacturer (retailer or other supplier) provides a replacement crib for use beginning on the June 28, 2011, compliance date, the crib must meet the requirements of the CPSC’s new crib standards.

CHILD CARE CENTERS, FOSTER HOMES, CHURCHES, HOSPITALS

 

  • My child care center still has drop-side cribs. Are they in violation of the regulation?No, child care facilities, family child care homes, and places of public accommodation, such as hotels and motels, have until December 28, 2012, to ensure that the cribs used in their facilities meet the requirements of the CPSC’s new crib standards.

    After this date, places of public accommodation may no longer use traditional drop-side cribs or noncompliant cribs and must use cribs meeting the new federal safety standards.

    Parents should talk with management about the new standards and the facility’s plan of action for replacing the cribs. Parents also should make sure their baby is not being placed in a recalled crib.

    Note: Child care facilities, family child care homes, and places of public accommodation should not resell, donate or give away a crib that does not meet the new crib standards, such as trying to resell the product through an online auction site or donating to a local thrift store. CPSC recommends disassembling the crib before discarding it.

  • Are portable cribs or play yards affected by the regulation?The crib standards cover portable cribs, but not play yards. CPSC’s crib rule includes a standard for full-size cribs (16 CFR part 1219) and a standard for non-full-size cribs (16 CFR part 1220). A non-full-size crib is a crib that is either larger or smaller (or otherwise shaped differently) from a full-size crib. The standard for non-full-size cribs covers portable cribs (a crib that “may be folded or collapsed, without disassembly, to occupy a volume substantially less than the volume it occupies when it is used”) as defined in that standard. The term “non-full-size crib” does not include products with mesh/net/screen or other non-rigid construction. Instead, enclosures with mesh or fabric sides are considered to be play yards and are not subject to the crib standards.

    CPSC is developing a separate mandatory federal standard for play yards.

  • Are hospitals required to provide cribs that comply with the CPSC’s new crib regulation?The CPSC crib rule requires only certain facilities to provide cribs that comply with CPSC requirements. Those places include child care facilities, family child care homes, and places of public accommodation such as hotels and motels. Hospital cribs are regulated by the U.S. Food and Drug Administration (Here’s the latest information from them), and thus, are considered to be medical devices. Cribs used in hospitals as medical devices are not required to comply with the new CPSC crib standards.

    However, the CPSC will treat a child care facility that is owned or operated by, or located in, a hospital the same way as any other child care facility. We will expect the facility’s cribs to meet the new crib standards by December 28, 2012, unless the facility provides documentation showing that the cribs are medical devices.

  • What types of child care arrangements are impacted by the new crib standards?The Consumer Product Safety Improvement Act of 2008 (CPSIA) directed the U.S. Consumer Product Safety Commission (CPSC) to issue the new crib standards and apply them to (among others) “any person that … based on the person’s occupation, holds itself out as having knowledge or skill peculiar to cribs, including child care facilities and family child care homes.” The law does not define “child care facility” or “family child care home.”

    Based on the CPSIA language and other federal programs related to child care, we consider a “child care facility” to mean a nonresidential setting that provides child care services (which could include early learning opportunities) for a fee. We consider “family child care home” to mean a location that provides child care services (which could include early learning opportunities) for a fee in a residential setting. The residential setting is usually in a home other than the one where the child resides, although the child or children of the caregiver may also attend.

    Licensing requirements vary widely from one state to another, and whether a child care provider is licensed does not determine the provider’s status as a child care facility or family child care home for purposes of CPSC’s crib standards.

    We do not consider “in-home care,” where a child is cared for in his/her own home or by a relative in the child’s home or the relative’s home, to be a “child care facility” or a “family child care home.”

    In turn, we do not consider such arrangements to be subject to the new crib standards.

  • Are churches/church nurseries subject to the new crib standards?The CPSIA does not provide any exclusion for churches. If a church operates a child care facility, the cribs it provides must comply with the CPSC’s crib standards. Given the language in the CPSIA, we consider a “child care facility” to be one that provides services for a fee or that pays a person (or persons) to take care of children. If volunteers take care of children without pay during a church service, we do not consider that arrangement to be a “child care facility”, and cribs used under such an arrangement would not be subject to the CPSC’s crib standards.
  • Are foster homes or residential facilities subject to the new crib standards?We consider a foster home to be a private residence where care is provided in the child’s own home. This arrangement is similar to in-home care and would not be subject to CPSC’s crib standards. However, in addition to child care facilities and family child care homes, CPSC’s crib standards apply to “places of public accommodation,” which means “any inn, hotel, or other establishment … that provides lodging to transient guests.”

    We consider a public residential facility (as opposed to a private residence) to be a place of public accommodation and subject to CPSC’s crib standards.

  • Are “hospital cribs” located in child care facilities subject to the new crib standards? 

    This depends on whether the crib is a medical “device.” CPSC’s crib standards do not apply to medical devices. A crib that meets the definition of “device” in the Federal Food, Drug, and Cosmetic Act (21 U.S.C. § 201(h)) is subject to regulation by the Food and Drug Administration (FDA), not CPSC. You should contact FDA’s Center for Devices and Radiological Health to determine if a particular crib is a “device.”

 

A crib that is located in a child care facility and is not a “device” is subject to CPSC’s crib standards.

MANUFACTURERS, IMPORTERS, RETAILERS

Retrofitting Cribs

 

  • Is it possible to retrofit a crib that is currently in use (e.g., in a child care facility) to meet the new crib standards?CPSC staff does not believe that a crib currently in use can be retrofitted and tested to show compliance with the new crib standards. Typically, a crib is destroyed in the process of testing; therefore, retrofitting cribs currently in use cannot be done. As discussed in the preamble to the final rule, the crib standards include multiple, complex requirements for many parts of a crib, making it difficult to determine whether a retrofitted crib currently in use would meet the requirements without testing that specific crib. (Section E.9 of the preamble to the final crib rule, 75 Fed. Reg. at 81771-72.) Also, a retrofit, such as a side rail immobilizer, which previously might have been an acceptable remedy to address a defect in a recalled crib, may not necessarily make a crib compliant with the new crib standards because additional new compliance requirements now apply to that crib design.
  • Is it possible for a retailer, manufacturer, or lessor to retrofit unused crib inventory to meet the new crib standards?Under some circumstances, it may be possible to retrofit unused, noncompliant crib inventory to meet the new crib standards. To comply with the new standards, an existing crib model – with the retrofit in place – must be put through the complete test regimen. In other words, the crib model, as it exists in inventory, must be tested with the retrofit, and it must meet all the provisions of the relevant new standards and be certified to the applicable new standards prior to its sale. The manufacturer should provide a way to ensure that all the crib models in inventory have been retrofitted properly. For unused cribs in inventory, we assume that cribs of the same model are sufficiently similar, so that when a model that is identical to the crib(s) in inventory is tested to the standard with the retrofit, and the crib passes the test, then that retrofit can be applied to all other identical models currently in inventory to make them compliant. It is the manufacturer’s, retailer’s, or lessor’s responsibility to ensure that all cribs sold (or resold or leased) on and after June 28, 2011, are compliant with the new standards. If a retrofit is used, it is the manufacturer’s or importer’s responsibility to provide certification of the retrofitted crib, following testing by a CPSC-accepted certifying body, to ensure that the inventory is sold only with a retrofit that makes the crib compliant with the standard. The same retrofit methods developed for a non-compliant unused crib cannot be applied to a crib model that is used or that currently is in use because each crib is unique, due to its use patterns. Therefore, each used crib unit would have to be tested with the retrofit in place before the crib could be certified. The testing can be destructive; and likely would render the crib unusable.
  • If inventory is retrofitted, what testing is required?

 

The crib model must be tested to the relevant crib standard (16 CFR part 1219 or 16 CFR part 1220) with the retrofit in place. The testing must be conducted by a third party testing body that has been accredited and accepted by the CPSC to test cribsto the new crib standards.

  • Must crib manufacturers, retailers, and lessors get approval from the CPSC to retrofit crib inventory?

 

No. The CPSC does not approve crib retrofit methods. The CPSC relies on the manufacturer’s/importer’s certification of compliance of the retrofitted product that is supported by testing to the applicable standard by a CPSC accepted conformity assessment body.

  • If a company has an inventory of cribs that do not comply with the new crib standards, could the company export the noncompliant cribs to another country?
    Yes. However, beginning June 28, 2011, a company first must notify the CPSC and follow the procedures stated in 16 CFR part 1019, pertaining to Export of Noncomplying, Misbranded, or Banned Products.

 

If you have additional questions, please e-mail them to feedback@cpsc.gov.

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This address for this post is: http://www.cpsc.gov/onsafety/2011/06/the-new-crib-standard-questions-and-answers/

Crib Immobilizers: Who to Call

New crib requirements passed by CPSC will stop traditional drop-side cribs from being made and sold within the next six months. The new crib requirements are among the most stringent in the world.

Those of you who already own cribs that do not meet the requirements of this new rule — especially drop-side cribs — need to know what to do with your cribs or the cribs that you need to buy in the next six months.

First, it’s important to remember that a non-recalled, sturdy crib is the SAFEST place for your baby to sleep. Second, if you own a drop-side crib regularly check your crib for safety

While CPSC staff cannot say that every drop-side crib is hazardous, based on investigations of incidents we have received, agency staff believes that most drop-side cribs are more prone to mechanical failure than similarly designed fixed-side cribs.

Some drop-side crib manufacturers have immobilizers that fit their cribs. Drop-side crib immobilizers are devices that are used to secure drop sides to prevent dangerous situations in which the drop side either partially or fully detaches from the crib.

As part of a recall, CPSC staff works with companies to provide fixes, or remedies, for products. For drop-side cribs, that remedy has been immobilizers.

Here’s a list of companies that have recalled their cribs and are providing immobilizers to secure the drop side on the cribs. These immobilizers were evaluated and approved by CPSC staff for use with these particular drop-side cribs.

If your drop-side crib manufacturer is not on this list, call the manufacturer and ask if they are making an immobilizer for your crib. Remember, though, that those particular immobilizers have not been tested or evaluated by CPSC staff for use with your specific crib.

Manufacturer Toll-Free Phone Number Website
Angel Line Longwood Forest (800) 889-8158 anytime www.angelline.com or e-mail the firm at parts@angelline.com
C&T International/Sorelle and Golden Baby (877) 791-9398 between 10 a.m. and 4 p.m. ET Monday through Friday www.candtinternational.net
Delta Enterprise Corp. (877) 342-3418 between 9 a.m. and 5 p.m. ET Monday through Friday www.cribrecallcenter.com
Dorel Asia (866) 762-2304 between 8 a.m. and 4:30 p.m. ET Monday through Friday www.dorel-asia.com
Ethan Allen (888) 339-9398 between 8:30 a.m. and 4:45 p.m. ET Monday through Friday www.ethanallen.com
Evenflo (800) 356-2229 between 8 a.m. and 5 p.m. ET Monday through Friday http://safety.evenflo.com
Jardine (800) 295-1980 between 9 a.m. and 5 p.m. ET  Monday through Friday www.jdservice.biz
LaJobi (Bonavita, Babi Italia and ISSI drop-side models) (888) 738-5676 anytime www.lajobi.com
LaJobi-manufactured Graco® wood cribs (888) 842-2215 anytime www.LaJobi.com
Kmart Heritage Collection 3-in-1 drop-side cribs (866) 499-2099 between 9:30 a.m. and 6 p.m. ET Monday through Friday www.victorylandgroup.com
Million Dollar Baby (888) 673-6488 anytime www.themdbfamily.com/safety
Simmons (877) 342-3439 between 9 a.m. and 5 p.m. Monday through Friday www.cribrecallcenter.com
Stork Craft and Stork Craft cribs with a Fisher-Price logo (877) 274-0277 anytime www.storkcraft.com

The following crib manufacturers have recalled cribs for which immobilizers are not available. In some cases, there may be other remedies or recommendations of what to do with your crib.

Manufacturer Contact Information if Available What You Do
Childcraft This company is out of business.Contact Foundations Worldwide (the new owner of the brand name) toll-free at (866) 614-0557 anytime or visit the firm’s website at www.cribsafetyinfo.com Foundations has agreed to provide Child Craft drop-side crib owners with a rebate towards the purchase of a new, fixed-side Child Craft brand crib manufactured by Foundations Worldwide Inc.
Generation 2 Worldwide and “ChildESIGNS” drop-side cribs Brands This company is out of business Stop using this crib and do not pass it on. Contact the store from which you purchased the crib (retail stores include Buy Buy Baby, Kmart and Walmart) for remedy information. Remedies vary by store between a refund, replacement crib or store credit.
Generation 2 Worldwide and “SafetyCraft” brand full-size and portable drop-side cribs This company is out of business Stop using this crib and do not pass it on. This warning involves all SafetyCraft drop-side cribs, including model 92-8112, manufactured and/or sold by Generation 2Worldwide.
Land of Nod “Rosebud” cribs manufactured by Status Furniture Contact The Land of Nod at (800) 933-9904 between 8:30 a.m. and 5 p.m. CT Monday through Friday, or email at recall@landofnod.com, or visit the firm’s website at www.landofnod.com Contact The Land of Nod to receive instructions on how to receive a merchandise credit for the full purchase price of the crib ($599). The Land of Nod is undertaking this recall for its customers because Status Furniture is out of business.
Simplicity Simplicity Inc. and SFCA Inc., the Reading, Pa.-based company that purchased Simplicity’s assets, are no longer in business. Look for your model and the remedy on this chart: http://www.cpsc.gov/cpscpub/prerel/prhtml09/09260list.html
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This address for this post is: http://www.cpsc.gov/onsafety/2010/12/crib-immobilizers-who-to-call/

Watch and Share: Check Your Crib for Safety

The drumbeat on drop-side cribs is continuing with the recall announcement today of more than 2 million more cribs. These cribs and the others that have already been recalled may well be in your house. They are made by Childcraft, Delta, Evenflo, Jardine, LaJobi, Million Dollar Baby, and Simmons.

There have been far too many tragedies involving babies and toddlers resulting from dangerous cribs. In the last five years, CPSC has announced 18 recalls involving more than 9 million drop-side cribs. The agency’s staff is actively investigating various crib manufacturers as part of a large, ongoing effort to remove unsafe cribs from the marketplace and your homes.

For many parents, the question is what to do with cribs in use right now. First and foremost after making sure that your crib hasn’t been recalled: Check your crib.

If you’re not quite sure what that means, this video is for you. Watch it, share it and take the advice of CPSC juvenile products engineer Patty Edwards. She is a premier expert on cribs and other nursery products.

(Read the transcript or watch in Windows Media format, or on CPSC’s YouTube Channel.)

If you’ve still got questions, here are a few that CPSC has received, along with answers:

Q: CPSC’s drop-side crib information makes me nervous about owning a drop-side crib, but I can’t afford a new crib. What should I do?

A: Check your crib as shown in the video. If your crib has loose sides or missing or broken pieces that you can’t easily tighten, then move your child to a different safe sleeping place. Depending on the child’s age, this can be a bassinet, a play yard or a toddler bed – so long as that product hasn’t been recalled as well.

Should I get an immobilizer for my crib, even if it hasn’t been recalled? Where do I get them?

An immobilizer stops the drop side from moving outwards as well as up and down. This prevents a baby from getting stuck between the drop side and the rest of the crib. You should get and use an immobilizer for your drop-side crib if it is available. Different cribs need different immobilizers. Contact your manufacturer to see if the company is offering or planning to offer an immobilizer for your crib.

Immobilizers should only be used on cribs that do not have broken or missing hardware. An immobilizer will not make broken cribs safe. An immobilizer will prevent future breakage and protect hardware.

In addition, immobilizers are meant to be used on newer cribs, not cribs that are older than 10 years.

The immobilizer fix kit on my recalled crib forced the drop side to become stationary. I’m short and can’t reach my baby. What can I do?

CPSC’s staff understands how difficult it can be for some moms to use a tall fixed-side crib. Some of us are short moms, too. Convenience, though, is a different question than safety. We at CPSC aim to provide you with the best information available to us to keep your baby safe.

Some manufacturers make cribs with drop-gates rather than drop sides and cribs that are lower to the ground.

If you’re short and are finding your newly fixed-side crib difficult to use, look for a safe solution to reach down to your baby. One solution could be a wide, sturdy step stool, such as the steps used in step aerobics.

I’m using a second-hand drop-side crib. Is this safe for my baby?

Age is a factor in the safety of any drop-side crib. At a minimum, CPSC staff recommends that you not use a crib that’s older than 10 years. Many older cribs may not meet current voluntary standards and can have numerous safety problems.

The more use a particular crib experiences over time, the more that crib will sustain wear and tear on hardware and joints, allowing screws to loosen and fall out and plastic parts to flex and break. Repeated assembly and disassembly increases the likelihood that crib parts can be damaged or lost. In addition, wood warps and shrinks over time, and glue can become brittle. This can lead to joint and slat failures.

Be sure to check your crib regularly and stop using it if you are at all uncertain about its safety.

Do you have other questions? E-mail them to feedback@cpsc.gov.

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This address for this post is: http://www.cpsc.gov/onsafety/2010/06/watch-and-share-check-your-crib-for-safety/

CPSC Warns Parents About Drop-Side Cribs

En Español

A baby can strangle in the “V” shape when the top portion of the drop side detaches.

A baby can strangle in the “V” shape when the top portion of the drop side detaches.

As part of its commitment to ensure safe sleep for young children, CPSC is once again warning parents and caregivers about deadly hazards with drop-side cribs. In the last five years, CPSC has announced 11 recalls involving more than 7 million drop-side cribs due to suffocation and strangulation hazards created by the drop side. CPSC staff is actively investigating several other crib manufacturers for potential drop-side hazards as part of a larger effort by the agency to rid the marketplace and homes of unsafe cribs. CPSC will continue to take aggressive action to address any risks and will keep the public informed.

CPSC Chairman Inez Tenenbaum has committed to parents and caregivers that there will be a new and vastly improved mandatory federal standard for cribs this year. The standard will incorporate, at minimum, the new voluntary standard banning drop-side cribs from the United States market. Due to the new voluntary industry standard, many manufacturers have already stopped selling drop-side cribs or will do so beginning June 1, 2010.

CPSC technical staff has determined drop-side cribs generally have a tendency to be less structurally sound than cribs with four fixed sides. Drop-side hardware is prone to break, deform or experience other problems during normal or foreseeable use. The older the crib, the more problems can be expected. When drop-side hardware breaks or deforms, the drop side can detach in one or more corners from the crib. If an infant or toddler rolls or moves into the space created by a partially detached drop side, the child can become entrapped or wedged between the crib mattress and the drop side and suffocate. Infants can also strangle in the “V” shape formed by a drop side that detaches in an upper corner.

Check your crib regularly and make sure it has not already been recalled. While CPSC staff cannot say that every drop-side crib is hazardous, based on investigations of incidents we have received, the agency believes that overall most drop-side cribs are more prone to mechanical failure than similar designed fixed-side cribs.

Read more

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This address for this post is: http://www.cpsc.gov/onsafety/2010/05/cpsc-warns-parents-about-drop-side-cribs/

Is Your Drop-Side Crib on the Recall List?

Graco-branded Lajobi drop-side cribs have now been added to the list of recalled cribs because the hardware can break or fail, allowing the drop side to detach from the crib.

CPSC and LaJobi have received 99 reports of drop-side incidents. In two of them, children became entrapped in the gap created by the detached drop side and were freed by their caregivers. Six other children fell through the gap, including one who sustained a mild concussion.

Since 2007, CPSC has recalled more than 7 million drop-side cribs in which children have died or been injured. Parents and caregivers who own a drop-side crib should check the crib’s brand and label against CPSC crib recalls

Here are some of the biggies:

It is important for parents and caregivers to regularly check cribs for loose or broken parts. If you have a broken crib, don’t use it and don’t try to fix it yourself. Do you have more questions? This crib blog Q&A is designed to answer your questions about what drop-sides are, whether they are safe, how to examine your crib and what to do if your crib has broken, missing or warped parts.

If you have further questions, e-mail them to feedback@cpsc.gov.

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This address for this post is: http://www.cpsc.gov/onsafety/2010/04/is-your-drop-side-crib-on-the-recall-list/