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CPSC Warns Parents About Drop-Side Cribs

En Español

A baby can strangle in the “V” shape when the top portion of the drop side detaches.

A baby can strangle in the “V” shape when the top portion of the drop side detaches.

As part of its commitment to ensure safe sleep for young children, CPSC is once again warning parents and caregivers about deadly hazards with drop-side cribs. In the last five years, CPSC has announced 11 recalls involving more than 7 million drop-side cribs due to suffocation and strangulation hazards created by the drop side. CPSC staff is actively investigating several other crib manufacturers for potential drop-side hazards as part of a larger effort by the agency to rid the marketplace and homes of unsafe cribs. CPSC will continue to take aggressive action to address any risks and will keep the public informed.

CPSC Chairman Inez Tenenbaum has committed to parents and caregivers that there will be a new and vastly improved mandatory federal standard for cribs this year. The standard will incorporate, at minimum, the new voluntary standard banning drop-side cribs from the United States market. Due to the new voluntary industry standard, many manufacturers have already stopped selling drop-side cribs or will do so beginning June 1, 2010.

CPSC technical staff has determined drop-side cribs generally have a tendency to be less structurally sound than cribs with four fixed sides. Drop-side hardware is prone to break, deform or experience other problems during normal or foreseeable use. The older the crib, the more problems can be expected. When drop-side hardware breaks or deforms, the drop side can detach in one or more corners from the crib. If an infant or toddler rolls or moves into the space created by a partially detached drop side, the child can become entrapped or wedged between the crib mattress and the drop side and suffocate. Infants can also strangle in the “V” shape formed by a drop side that detaches in an upper corner.

Check your crib regularly and make sure it has not already been recalled. While CPSC staff cannot say that every drop-side crib is hazardous, based on investigations of incidents we have received, the agency believes that overall most drop-side cribs are more prone to mechanical failure than similar designed fixed-side cribs.

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This address for this post is: http://www.cpsc.gov/onsafety/2010/05/cpsc-warns-parents-about-drop-side-cribs/

Your Simplicity Crib Recall Questions Answered

En Español
Q: I have a Simplicity Model 8997 Crib. It appears to have the same type of mattress support. I am not sure if it is included in the recall or not. I have not seen it on any of the lists. I am concerned that it is one that was missed. Has this model been evaluated? Have there been any reports of incidents? I am concerned because it does appear to have a gap between the mattress and the sides of the crib. In some areas the gap seems rather large. I would appreciate a response at your earliest convenience.

A: CPSC has heard this question many times since last week’s recall. ALL Simplicity cribs with the tubular metal mattress have been recalled. Because Simplicity is out of business, CPSC does not know all the model numbers that use the tubular metal mattress support. The model numbers listed in the recall are the ones that CPSC is certain exist, but many other model numbers are affected as well.

Q: I just found on the website that my son’s crib was recalled in September of 2008, but I had never seen anything about this until now. It has the tubular mattress support and the site says that all the cribs with this design are being recalled. What if I don’t have a receipt showing when or where it was purchased? Can I still take it back to the store where it was purchased? I don’t want to take it all apart and make a 35 minute trek to my “local” Walmart, and then be told there’s nothing they can do. Please let me know.

A: You do not need a receipt to return a recalled crib to the retailer. The recalled cribs were sold at Walmart, Target, Babies R Us and other stores nationwide. Contact the store where the crib was purchased to receive a refund, replacement crib or store credit. This Simplicity recalls chart shows you numerous Simplicity nursery products that have been recalled and what you can do. CPSC recommends that you bring the recall notice with you to the retailer when you return your crib in case the retailer has questions.

Q: Are retailers required to provide a remedy? If the retailers are not providing a remedy that I like, for instance minimal refunds, do I have any other options?

Because Simplicity is no longer in business, CPSC reached out to retailers to request they voluntarily participate in the recall. Many retailers, including those identified above, have voluntarily agreed to provide consumers with a refund, store credit or replacement crib, at their discretion. If your retailer is refusing to provide any remedy, please let us know so that CPSC staff can contact the retailer.

A company may take into account the age of a product when providing a refund or store credit.

Simplicity Crib with tubular metal mattress support

One of the bars in this Simplicity mattress support has detached. Others are bent.

Q: My crib is part of the Simplicity crib recall due to having a metal tube frame system (for the mattress to rest on). I do not have a drop rail. I checked my crib. It seems fine, no loose parts, it does not wiggle one bit when I try to move/shake it. If my crib seems structurally fine can I let my child sleep on it?

A: Do NOT continue to use this crib or any crib that has been recalled. These Simplicity drop-side and fixed side cribs have been recalled because the mattress support can collapse and pieces can bend or detach. CPSC is aware of a one-year-old who died in a fixed-side Simplicity crib. CPSC also knows of more than a dozen additional incidents involving the recalled cribs collapsing due to bending or detaching metal pieces in the mattress support frame.

Make sure to find an alternate safe sleeping environment for your child until you have a new crib in place. If your baby is less than six months old and is not yet able to push up to his/her hands and knees, you can put your baby to sleep in a bassinet. After that, you can use a play yard. Once your child is mobile and is climbing out, you can use a toddler bed or a mattress on the floor.

This address for this post is: http://www.cpsc.gov/onsafety/2010/05/your-simplicity-crib-recall-questions-answered/

Is Your Drop-Side Crib on the Recall List?

Graco-branded Lajobi drop-side cribs have now been added to the list of recalled cribs because the hardware can break or fail, allowing the drop side to detach from the crib.

CPSC and LaJobi have received 99 reports of drop-side incidents. In two of them, children became entrapped in the gap created by the detached drop side and were freed by their caregivers. Six other children fell through the gap, including one who sustained a mild concussion.

Since 2007, CPSC has recalled more than 7 million drop-side cribs in which children have died or been injured. Parents and caregivers who own a drop-side crib should check the crib’s brand and label against CPSC crib recalls

Here are some of the biggies:

It is important for parents and caregivers to regularly check cribs for loose or broken parts. If you have a broken crib, don’t use it and don’t try to fix it yourself. Do you have more questions? This crib blog Q&A is designed to answer your questions about what drop-sides are, whether they are safe, how to examine your crib and what to do if your crib has broken, missing or warped parts.

If you have further questions, e-mail them to feedback@cpsc.gov.

This address for this post is: http://www.cpsc.gov/onsafety/2010/04/is-your-drop-side-crib-on-the-recall-list/

How to Childproof Your Windows

Do you have young children in your home? If so, be sure to child-proof your windows before letting the warm spring air waft through your house. Such measures are like installing baby gates – they keep your baby safe with little extra effort.

Window falls are common, particularly in spring and summer. And they are preventable. Just take a look at these news reports from the first few days of April:

Pennsylvania boy, age 3, falls from a window and sustains head injuries.

Oklahoma 5-year-old falls from second-story window. His condition is unknown.

5-year-old Omaha girl survives 2-story fall with only bumps and bruises

Grand Rapids boy, age 2, survives fall from 2nd story window with minor injuries.

This week, by the way, is the National Safety Council’s National Window Safety week. But a week of such reports is not unusual. On average each year, 9 children die and about 3,700 are injured from window falls.

CPSC recommends the following ways to child-proof your windows and prevent your children from having a serious fall:

Window Guard

Window guards screw into the side of a window frame and have bars no more than 4 inches apart.

      • Install window guards to prevent children from falling out of windows. For windows on the 6th floor and below, install window guards that adults and older children can open easily in case of a fire.

Window guards screw into the side of a window frame and have bars no more than 4 inches apart. They are sold in different sizes for various size windows and adjust for width. Guards must meet requirements for spacing and strength. Those that allow for escape in case of emergencies must be difficult for very young children to open.

• If you don’t use window guards, install and use window stops so that windows open no more than 4 inches. Whether opening windows from the bottom, top, or side, openings should never exceed 4 inches with children present.

• Move furniture, including cribs and beds, away from windows to discourage children from climbing near windows. Use extra caution on windows next to window seats where children may climb and play.

• Bug screens are NOT baby gates. They keep bugs out, but they are not strong enough to keep toddlers in. Do not rely on them to keep your windows child-safe.

• Whenever possible, open windows from the top, not the bottom.

This address for this post is: http://www.cpsc.gov/onsafety/2010/04/how-to-child-proof-your-windows/

Generation 2 Crib Update

Last month, CPSC announced a recall of all Generation 2 Worldwide and ChildESIGNS drop side cribs.

CPSC received reports of three infants who suffocated when they became entrapped between the crib mattress and the drop side when the drop side detached.

The crib’s plastic hardware can break, which can cause the drop side of the crib to detach from a corner of the crib. When the drop side detaches, it creates a space into which an infant or toddler can roll and become wedged or entrapped, creating a risk of suffocation or strangulation. In addition, the crib’s mattress support can detach from the crib frame, creating a hazardous space in which an infant or toddler could become entrapped and suffocate or strangle.

Consumers responded with questions, in particular whether this recall applies to Generation 2 Worldwide and ChildESIGNS portable drop side cribs as well as full-sized cribs.

The answer: Yes.

The portable drop-side cribs, like their larger counterparts may pose the same safety problems. Thanks, consumers for listening and asking follow-up questions.

Parents and caregivers should stop using ALL Generation 2 Worldwide and ChildESIGNS drop side cribs – portable and full-sized – and find an alternative safe sleeping environment for your baby. Do not attempt to fix these cribs.

This address for this post is: http://www.cpsc.gov/onsafety/2010/03/generation-2-crib-update/