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The Sounds of Trampoline Safety

Blog in Spanish

Jump, bounce, squeal.  These are the happy sounds of a child playing on a trampoline in the backyard. Girl bouncing on trampoline

In between bounces a young child calls out to his friend, “Join me.”

The friend races out to the backyard and bounds onto the trampoline.

The sound of an “uh-oh” about to happen.

Only one person should be on a trampoline at a time.

Then, THUD.

The noise you don’t want to hear, typically followed by a child crying.

While just playing in and around the house, children often stub their fingers, bonk their heads, and fall down—all minor injuries.

Getting hurt on a trampoline can be much worse.

Last year, about 95,000 people suffered injuries of such a serious nature that there were taken to an emergency room for treatment.  Between 2000 and 2009, 22 families lost a loved one from a trampoline mishap.

Installing and maintaining the enclosure around the trampolines and being aware that children younger than 5 are at the greatest risk of injury can make for a safer experience in the back yard.

Zip, cover, scoot.  These are the sounds of you making the trampoline a safer place to play.

  • Zip up the surrounding enclosure.
  • Cover the springs, hooks and frame in shock-absorbing pads.
  • Scoot the trampoline away from structures and trees.

Help minimize the risks of trampoline play.  Learn more on our Trampoline Safety Alert page.

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This address for this post is: http://www.cpsc.gov/onsafety/2013/07/the-sounds-of-trampoline-safety/

Safety for Dad

Dads do lawnmowers. Dads do grills. This Father’s Day, give your dad the information that will help him do what he does safely.

Each year, about 110 people die and about 87,000 people are treated in emergency rooms from injuries associated with power lawnmowers. This includes walk-behind mowers, riding mowers, lawn tractors and garden tractors.

If you’re buying dad a new walk-behind rotary lawn mower, consider these factors. Then remind him about safety:

  • Fill the fuel tank before starting the engine. NEVER refuel when the mower is running or hot.
  • Pick up twigs, rocks and other debris before you mow. The whole family can help with this. Just make sure that children clear the area before the actual mowing begins.
  • Cut dry grass, not wet grass. Wet clippings could jam the rotary blade and shut down the engine. When you need to remove clippings from the discharge chute, STOP the mower.
  • Push the mower forward. Don’t pull it backward.
  • On lawn slopes, if you are using a walk-behind rotary mower, mow across the slope. If you drive a riding mower, drive up and down the slope, not across it.
  • Check safety features often and repair or replace them if needed. Do not remove any safety devices from a mower.
  • When using an electric mower, organize your work so you first cut the area closest to the electrical outlet and then gradually move away. This will minimize your chance of running over the power cord and getting electrocuted.

Dads grilling
As for the grill, here’s a maintenance and safety checklist for gas grills. Give him these key points:

  • Check the grill’s hoses for cracking, brittleness, holes and leaks. The hose or tubing shouldn’t have any sharp bends.
  • Hoses need to be as far from the hot surfaces as possible. Don’t let grease drip on them.
  • Any time you reconnect a grill to the LP gas container, or if you smell gas, check for leaks. To do this, open the gas supply valve fully and apply a soapy solution (one part water, one part liquid detergent) with a brush at the connection points. If you see bubbles, there’s a leak. Turn off the gas, tighten the connection and test again. If you can’t stop the leak, replace the leaking parts.
  • Do NOT light a grill if you detect a leak.

On average, about 3,600 people are treated in emergency rooms each year from injuries associated with gas, charcoal or propane grills. Of the 12 deaths each year associated with grills, about two-thirds are from carbon monoxide poisoning when a grill is used in an enclosed space like inside a house.

When grilling, always follow these safety tips:

  • Only use a grill at least 10 feet away from your house or any building. Do not grill in a garage, breezeway, carport, porch, or under any surface that will burn.
  • Never leave a grill unattended.
  • Keep children away from the grill. The outside surface can burn when touched.
  • Always follow the instructions that came with the grill.

All of this advice is meant to ensure that dad doesn’t spend Father’s Day in the emergency room. Have a happy and safe Father’s Day!

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This address for this post is: http://www.cpsc.gov/onsafety/2012/06/safety-for-dad/

Grilling Time: Fire It Up Safely

Summer officially kicks off this weekend and millions of Americans will celebrate with a cookout.  Before lighting the grill do a safety check.

  • Has your grill been recalled? Check SaferProducts.gov. If the grill has been recalled, contact the manufacturer and stop using it until you get a repair or replacement.
  • Visually inspect the hoses on a gas grill for cracking, brittleness, holes, and leaks. Make sure there are no sharp bends in the hose or tubing and that all connections are secure. Replace if necessary.
  • Check for propane gas leaks. Open the gas supply valve fully and apply a soapy solution with a brush at the connection point. If bubbles appear, there is a leak. Try tightening the tank connection. If that does not stop the leak, close the gas valve and have the grill repaired by a qualified professional.
  • Is the grill clean? Regularly cleaning the grill, as described in the owner’s manual, and also cleaning the grease trap, will reduce the risk of flare-ups and grease fires.

Don’t let this:
Charcoal grill with flames

Turn into this:

House on fire

Once the safety check is complete, make sure to operate the grill as safely as possible.

  • Use grills outside only in a well-ventilated area. Never use a grill indoors or in a garage, breezeway, carport, porch, or under a surface that will burn. Gas and charcoal grills present a risk of fire and/or carbon monoxide (CO) poisoning that could result in injury or death. An estimated 3,800 gas or charcoal grill-related injuries were treated in hospital emergency departments in 2010. While almost all of the injuries were burns, a few of the charcoal grill injuries were related to carbon monoxide.There were an estimated average of eight CO-related deaths per year between 2005 and 2007 associated with charcoal grills that were used indoors or in enclosed spaces.
  • Never leave a grill unattended. If a flare-up occurs, adjust the controls on the gas grill or spread out the coals on a charcoal grill to lower the temperature. If a grease fire occurs, turn off the gas grill and use baking soda and/or a kitchen fire extinguisher to put out the fire.
  • Keep the grill hoses as far away as possible from hot surfaces and dripping hot grease.
  • Keep children away from the grill area. The outside surface of a grill can get hot and burn when touched.
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This address for this post is: http://www.cpsc.gov/onsafety/2011/05/grilling-time-fire-it-up-safely/