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Don’t let injuries from fireworks become part of your tradition this holiday

Fireworks

Blog en español

Often, when thinking of the Fourth of July, one of the first things that come to mind are big, beautiful fireworks, with vibrant colors that light up a summer night’s sky. In the midst of all this holiday grandeur, it is important to understand fireworks safety and how to prevent tragedy during your July 4 celebration.

In 2013, 65 percent or 7,400, of all firework injuries occurred in the 30 days surrounding July 4th. The majority of these injuries occurred simply because of the malfunction or improper use of legal and illegal fireworks.

Here are some ways fireworks can malfunction:

  • Inconsistent flight paths
  • Tip-over incidents
  • Early or late ignitions
  • Debris and blowouts

You, your friends, and family can be put at risk by:

  • Purchasing and using illegal fireworks;
  • Letting children use fireworks, including sparklers and firecrackers;
  • Creating or modifying any fireworks;
  • Igniting fireworks too close to someone or something; and
  • Setting off fireworks improperly.

Small fireworks, like bottle rockets, sparklers, and small firecrackers can appear harmless to children, but during the 30 days surrounding July 4, these kinds of fireworks injured an estimated 1,000 children under the age of 5.

Did you know that sparklers can burn so hot they can melt copper? A sparkler can burn at 2,000 degrees Fahrenheit or hotter! That’s as hot as a blow torch!

Take a look at our “Un Spark-tacular Celebration” video on children with sparklers.

If you do decide to buy legal fireworks, be sure to take the following safety steps:

  • Never allow young children to play with or ignite fireworks.
  • Avoid buying fireworks that come in brown paper packaging; often, this can often be a sign that the fireworks were made for professional displays and could pose a danger to consumers.
  • Never have any portion of your body directly over a fireworks device when lighting the fuse.
  • Move away to a safe distance immediately after lighting.
  • Never try to re-light or pick up fireworks that have not gone off or fully functioned.
  • Never point or throw fireworks at another person.
  • Keep a bucket of water or a garden hose handy in case of fire or other mishap.
  • Light one item at a time, then move away quickly.
  • After fireworks have gone off and fully functioned, douse the spent device with plenty of water from a bucket or hose before discarding, to prevent a trash fire.
  • Make sure fireworks are legal in your area before buying or using them.
  • Know the risks. Prevent the tragedies. And, have an injury-free Fourth!

Celebrate with safety this Fourth of July.

 

For more information on fireworks safety, visit our Fireworks Safety Information Center.

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This address for this post is: http://www.cpsc.gov/onsafety/2014/06/dont-let-injuries-from-fireworks-become-part-of-your-tradition-this-holiday/

CPSC Science: Fireworks Injuries 2014 Update

Blog en español

We have an updated version of our Fireworks Injuries infographic. The risks are the same. The only change is in the numbers. We also post these infographics on Flickr for easy sharing.

Lesiones con Fuegos Artificiales

 

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This address for this post is: http://www.cpsc.gov/onsafety/2014/06/cpsc-science-fireworks-injuries-2014/

Ride Smart to Avoid Tragedy

Memorial Day Weekend is tough on all-terrain vehicle riders.

 

During the four days of the 2013 Memorial Day weekend, there were at least 14 deaths and an estimated 2,850 emergency room treated injuries associated with ATV usage, according to reports gathered by CPSC. Four of the 14 fatalities during that weekend involved children younger than 16. Reports for the four holiday weekends from 2009 to 2012 show a total of more than 73 ATV-related fatalities.

Let’s make this year different and this riding season safer, starting with Memorial Day Weekend.

CPSC is urging riders to throttle up safe practices in order to put the brakes on life-altering tragedies. Ride safe by following these basic rules of the trail:

  • Don’t allow children younger than 16 to drive or ride on adult ATVs.
  • Never allow a child younger than 6 to drive or ride on any ATV.
  • Never have more people on the vehicle than it was designed to carry.
  • Always wear a helmet and protective gear when riding any ATV. If the vehicle is designed to carry passengers, make sure they have on protective gear, too.
  • Don’t drive an off-road vehicle on paved roads.
  • Take a hands-on safety training course. This is especially important for young or first-time operators.

ROV drivers and riders need to be vigilant this riding season, as well. Overall deaths associated with these powerful machines with car-like seats and steering wheels have reached more than 400 over the past 10 years.

In addition to the tips for ATV riders, ROV drivers and passengers should take these steps:

  • Never have more passengers than there are seat belts and never carry passengers in cargo beds.
  • Always fasten seat belts and keep all parts of your body inside the vehicle.
  • Never transport passengers who cannot place both feet on the floorboard with their backs against the seat..

And, whether you’re operating an ATV or an ROV, drive at a safe speed and use care when turning and crossing slopes.

Ride smart and ride safe to avoid tragedies this weekend and all season long.

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This address for this post is: http://www.cpsc.gov/onsafety/2014/05/ride-smart-to-avoid-tragedy/

Before You Start Your Summer Fun, Check for These Recalled Products

Winter is finally giving way to warmer weather. This means kids are playing outside and adults are firing up their grills and working on their lawns. Now would be a good time to check on whether any of your summer products were recalled this past winter. Check out the list of recalled products below. To check other products for safety issues, go to SaferProducts.gov.

Product Photo Product Units Hazard
Char-Broil Grill
Char-Broil Recalls Patio Bistro Gas Grills 69,300 units in U.S. and 1,900 in Canada The electronic ignition on the grill can ignite unexpectedly, posing a burn hazard.
Snoopy150 Snoopy Sno-Cone Machines Recalled by LaRose Industries 102,000 units A brass rivet can fall out of the sno-cone machine’s ice-shaving cylinder and into a sno-cone, posing a risk of injury to the mouth or the teeth.
ToroMower150 Toro Recalls TimeMaster and TurfMaster Lawn Mowers 34,500 units in United States and 1,600 in Canada The mower’s blade can break and injure the user and others nearby.
Solowave Recalls Home Playground Tube Slides with Port Holes Solowave Recalls Home Playground Tube Slides with Port Holes 10,800 in the United States and 9,900 in Canada The plastic port hole-type windows in the tube slide can break, posing a laceration hazard to children.
Sterling Rope Company Recalls Sewn Cords Sterling Rope Company Recalls Sewn Cords 9,200 in the United States and 480 in Canada Sewn cords break at a lower weight than published weight values, posing a fall hazard.
Nationwide Industries Recalls Trident Pool Gate Latches Nationwide Industries Recalls Trident Pool Gate Latches 2,500 units The magnet contained in the striker portion of the latch assembly can come loose, preventing the latch from securing a gate.
Horizon Hobby Recalls Remote Controlled Model Helicopters Horizon Hobby Recalls Remote Controlled Model Helicopters 1,980 units United States and 200 in Canada The tail rotor grip used for securing the tail rotor blade to the tail rotor hub can separate and release from the helicopter, posing a risk of a crash and injury hazard.
Gas Trimmers Recalled by efco Gas Trimmers Recalled by efco 1,400 units in the United States and 166 in Canada The muffler on the trimmer’s engine can break during use and pose a fire hazard.
ClayBowl150 Nantucket Distributing Recalls Clay Bowl Outdoor Fireplaces 1,200 units When fire is lit, pieces of the clay fireplace bowl can blow off of the bowl posing impact and burn hazards
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This address for this post is: http://www.cpsc.gov/onsafety/2014/04/before-you-start-your-summer-fun-check-for-these-recalled-products/

The Sounds of Trampoline Safety

Blog in Spanish

Jump, bounce, squeal.  These are the happy sounds of a child playing on a trampoline in the backyard. Girl bouncing on trampoline

In between bounces a young child calls out to his friend, “Join me.”

The friend races out to the backyard and bounds onto the trampoline.

The sound of an “uh-oh” about to happen.

Only one person should be on a trampoline at a time.

Then, THUD.

The noise you don’t want to hear, typically followed by a child crying.

While just playing in and around the house, children often stub their fingers, bonk their heads, and fall down—all minor injuries.

Getting hurt on a trampoline can be much worse.

Last year, about 95,000 people suffered injuries of such a serious nature that there were taken to an emergency room for treatment.  Between 2000 and 2009, 22 families lost a loved one from a trampoline mishap.

Installing and maintaining the enclosure around the trampolines and being aware that children younger than 5 are at the greatest risk of injury can make for a safer experience in the back yard.

Zip, cover, scoot.  These are the sounds of you making the trampoline a safer place to play.

  • Zip up the surrounding enclosure.
  • Cover the springs, hooks and frame in shock-absorbing pads.
  • Scoot the trampoline away from structures and trees.

Help minimize the risks of trampoline play.  Learn more on our Trampoline Safety Alert page.

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This address for this post is: http://www.cpsc.gov/onsafety/2013/07/the-sounds-of-trampoline-safety/