OnSafety is the Official Blog Site of the U.S. Consumer Product Safety Commission. Here you'll find the latest safety information as well as important messages that will keep you and your family safe. We hope you'll visit often!

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Buying Toys – Safer Toys.

How things have changed when it comes to toy safety.  Back in 2008, 172 toys were recalled — 19 due to lead. In fiscal year 2013, there were 31 toy recalls — none were related to lead.

 

Our new global system to make toys safer means:

  • Toys are now tested by independent, third-party testing laboratories around the world.
  • CPSC and U.S. Customs and Border Patrol are at the ports, stopping toys that violate U.S. standards before they reach children’s hands. This recent video shows an example of a recent toy stoppage.
  • You can shop with confidence. Just remember to use products with care.

 

Here are some things you should know:

  • Five of the 11 toy-related deaths in 2012 occurred when children were riding tricycles.
  • Four of those children were found in pools.
  • Two other children died when they rode scooters into traffic and were unfortunately hit.

Helmets, safety gear and supervision are key for safety when children play on riding toys.

Finally, CPSC continues to be concerned with children’s access to high-powered magnet sets:

 

Here are some additional toy safety tips:

  • Keep deflated and broken balloons away from children.
  • Keep small balls and other toys with small parts away from children under 3.
  • Supervise battery charging. Pay attention to instructions and warnings on these chargers. Some chargers lack a mechanism to prevent overcharging.
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This address for this post is: http://www.cpsc.gov/onsafety/2013/12/buying-toys-safer-toys/

The Sounds of Trampoline Safety

Blog in Spanish

Jump, bounce, squeal.  These are the happy sounds of a child playing on a trampoline in the backyard. Girl bouncing on trampoline

In between bounces a young child calls out to his friend, “Join me.”

The friend races out to the backyard and bounds onto the trampoline.

The sound of an “uh-oh” about to happen.

Only one person should be on a trampoline at a time.

Then, THUD.

The noise you don’t want to hear, typically followed by a child crying.

While just playing in and around the house, children often stub their fingers, bonk their heads, and fall down—all minor injuries.

Getting hurt on a trampoline can be much worse.

Last year, about 95,000 people suffered injuries of such a serious nature that there were taken to an emergency room for treatment.  Between 2000 and 2009, 22 families lost a loved one from a trampoline mishap.

Installing and maintaining the enclosure around the trampolines and being aware that children younger than 5 are at the greatest risk of injury can make for a safer experience in the back yard.

Zip, cover, scoot.  These are the sounds of you making the trampoline a safer place to play.

  • Zip up the surrounding enclosure.
  • Cover the springs, hooks and frame in shock-absorbing pads.
  • Scoot the trampoline away from structures and trees.

Help minimize the risks of trampoline play.  Learn more on our Trampoline Safety Alert page.

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This address for this post is: http://www.cpsc.gov/onsafety/2013/07/the-sounds-of-trampoline-safety/

CPSC Infographic: Big Real Rough Tough Deadly ATV Statistics

Blog en español

This infographic is also posted on CPSC’s Flickr page for easy sharing.

Big, real, rough, tough deadly ATV statistics

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This address for this post is: http://www.cpsc.gov/onsafety/2013/07/cpsc-infographic-big-real-rough-tough-deadly-atv-statistics/

Tips to Keep Your Happy Camper Safe

Blog en español

Now that you found the perfect summer camp that meets your expectations, accreditation standards, and your child’s appetite for fun, wait before you exhale. Sunscreen and labeling your child’s clothes aren’t the only final items on your to-do list. Add some time to review safety with your happy campers before you send them on their adventure.

A good place to start is by looking at a list of the camp’s planned activities. If sports are involved, remember that many sports aren’t complete without helmets. Safety equipment and athletics go hand in hand. Therefore, if you don’t plan to pack a helmet, ask the camp if it supplies the right helmet for each activity. Here’s a helmet guide that gives you more information.

In addition, here are safety tips on different sports:

Given the hot days of summer, it’s likely that your camp will include swimming or some other water play. As you pack bathing suits, take a moment to go over pool and water safety with your child.

  • If your child does not know how to swim, alert the camp. Find out if the camp gives swim lessons and register your child to take them. Learning to swim is a key first step in drowning prevention.
  • Check to see if the camp has life jackets for activities on docks or boats. CDC calls them a “must.” They aren’t a substitute for supervision, but they do act as another barrier against drowning.
  • For kids who already know how to swim, brush up on swim safety.
  • Tell your child NOT to go to the pool without supervision from a camp counselor or an adult.

Are you packing a hoodie for some cool nights of outdoor camping? Look at the neck and waist for drawstrings and remove them. Drawstrings can catch or become tangled with objects, such as a car door or playground slide, causing an injury.

 

Enjoy your child’s camp send off with hugs, kisses and safety.

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This address for this post is: http://www.cpsc.gov/onsafety/2013/07/tips-to-keep-your-happy-camper-safe/

Bicycle Safety: It’s No Accident!

Blog en español

Tune up your bikes, and get riding!

Around the country this month, organizations are sponsoring Bike to School and Bike to Work days. It’s a great time to remind yourselves and your kids about bike safety.
Mother strapping helmet on a child.
Step 1: “Strap It On, Save a Life.” Having a helmet head is cool—and it protects your brain. Nearly 70 percent of all fatal bicycle crashes involve head injuries. Wearing a properly fitted bicycle helmet can reduce the risk of a brain and head injury by as much as 85 percent.  Follow these tips to make sure your helmet is doing its job:

  • When buying a helmet look for the label that reads “Complies with U.S. CPSC Safety Standards for Bicycle Helmets.”
  • Tighten chin straps and adjust padding so the helmet feels snug, forms a V around the ears, and does not move up and down or side to side. Watch this video from the National Highway Traffic Safety Administration on how to put a helmet on correctly.

Step 2: Check your family’s bikes for safety.

  • Make sure the tires have the proper amount of air.
  • Adjust and tighten the seat and handlebars. Remember, kids grow!
  • Check and adjust the brakes so your family’s riders can stop quickly.
  • Consider taking bikes to a local bike shop for a tune up periodically.

Step 3: Be alert when riding.

  • Ride on the right side of the road in a straight, predictable path.
  • Children younger than 9 should not ride on roads. They don’t yet have the skills to identify and avoid dangerous situations.

Want to know more?  This bicycle safety page has brochures and posters to guide you to better bike riding safety.

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This address for this post is: http://www.cpsc.gov/onsafety/2013/05/bicycle-safety-its-no-accident/