OnSafety is the Official Blog Site of the U.S. Consumer Product Safety Commission. Here you'll find the latest safety information as well as important messages that will keep you and your family safe. We hope you'll visit often!

Welcome!

The Sounds of Trampoline Safety

Blog in Spanish

Jump, bounce, squeal.  These are the happy sounds of a child playing on a trampoline in the backyard. Girl bouncing on trampoline

In between bounces a young child calls out to his friend, “Join me.”

The friend races out to the backyard and bounds onto the trampoline.

The sound of an “uh-oh” about to happen.

Only one person should be on a trampoline at a time.

Then, THUD.

The noise you don’t want to hear, typically followed by a child crying.

While just playing in and around the house, children often stub their fingers, bonk their heads, and fall down—all minor injuries.

Getting hurt on a trampoline can be much worse.

Last year, about 95,000 people suffered injuries of such a serious nature that there were taken to an emergency room for treatment.  Between 2000 and 2009, 22 families lost a loved one from a trampoline mishap.

Installing and maintaining the enclosure around the trampolines and being aware that children younger than 5 are at the greatest risk of injury can make for a safer experience in the back yard.

Zip, cover, scoot.  These are the sounds of you making the trampoline a safer place to play.

  • Zip up the surrounding enclosure.
  • Cover the springs, hooks and frame in shock-absorbing pads.
  • Scoot the trampoline away from structures and trees.

Help minimize the risks of trampoline play.  Learn more on our Trampoline Safety Alert page.

Bookmark and Share

This address for this post is: http://www.cpsc.gov/onsafety/2013/07/the-sounds-of-trampoline-safety/

Kids Can Strangle in Window Cords

Blog in Spanishbaby doll being strangled by a window cord.

Do you live in military housing with your family?   Take a look at your window blinds or other type of window coverings, including Roman shades.  If you can see any dangling or accessible cords, your child is at risk.

Window coverings with exposed cords are one of the top hidden home hazards.  Kids can easily and quickly wrap the cords around their necks or become entangled in the cord loops.

In fact, one child strangles in window cords nearly every month and another child is hurt.  This can happen quickly and silently.  Sadly, some of the incidents occurred in military housing. We want to help you and your family to be safe and secure in your home.

So, on Military Consumer Protection Day (July 17 this year), examine your window blinds, curtains and shades closely. Look for exposed, looped cords. What you find may surprise you.  What you do about it can save your child’s life.

Here is how you can safeguard your windows.

  • Use cordless blinds or go with blinds or shades that have inaccessible cords. Many stores have these products available for purchase right now.

 

  • Move cribs, beds, and furniture away from windows, because children can climb on them and reach the cords on the window coverings.

 

  • Make loose cords inaccessible, if you are unable to replace older blinds and shades.

In the past, many consumers have used free repair kits from the Window Covering Safety Council (WCSC) to fix their blinds that were made before November 2000.  Keep in mind that these kits do not get rid of the dangling pull cord hazard with many common window blinds.

Kids and cords are a dangerous combination. So, if you have young children in your house, your safest approach is to go cordless or buy blinds with inaccessible cords.

Bookmark and Share

This address for this post is: http://www.cpsc.gov/onsafety/2013/07/kids-can-strangle-in-window-cords/

CPSC Infographic: Big Real Rough Tough Deadly ATV Statistics

Blog en español

This infographic is also posted on CPSC’s Flickr page for easy sharing.

Big, real, rough, tough deadly ATV statistics

Bookmark and Share

This address for this post is: http://www.cpsc.gov/onsafety/2013/07/cpsc-infographic-big-real-rough-tough-deadly-atv-statistics/

Tips to Keep Your Happy Camper Safe

Blog en español

Now that you found the perfect summer camp that meets your expectations, accreditation standards, and your child’s appetite for fun, wait before you exhale. Sunscreen and labeling your child’s clothes aren’t the only final items on your to-do list. Add some time to review safety with your happy campers before you send them on their adventure.

A good place to start is by looking at a list of the camp’s planned activities. If sports are involved, remember that many sports aren’t complete without helmets. Safety equipment and athletics go hand in hand. Therefore, if you don’t plan to pack a helmet, ask the camp if it supplies the right helmet for each activity. Here’s a helmet guide that gives you more information.

In addition, here are safety tips on different sports:

Given the hot days of summer, it’s likely that your camp will include swimming or some other water play. As you pack bathing suits, take a moment to go over pool and water safety with your child.

  • If your child does not know how to swim, alert the camp. Find out if the camp gives swim lessons and register your child to take them. Learning to swim is a key first step in drowning prevention.
  • Check to see if the camp has life jackets for activities on docks or boats. CDC calls them a “must.” They aren’t a substitute for supervision, but they do act as another barrier against drowning.
  • For kids who already know how to swim, brush up on swim safety.
  • Tell your child NOT to go to the pool without supervision from a camp counselor or an adult.

Are you packing a hoodie for some cool nights of outdoor camping? Look at the neck and waist for drawstrings and remove them. Drawstrings can catch or become tangled with objects, such as a car door or playground slide, causing an injury.

 

Enjoy your child’s camp send off with hugs, kisses and safety.

Bookmark and Share

This address for this post is: http://www.cpsc.gov/onsafety/2013/07/tips-to-keep-your-happy-camper-safe/

CPSC Science: Fireworks Injuries 2013 Update

Blog en español

Back after high demand last year, we have an updated version of our Fireworks Injuries infographic. The risks are the same. The only change is in the numbers. We also post these infographics on Flickr for easy sharing.

Fireworks injuries infographic

Bookmark and Share

This address for this post is: http://www.cpsc.gov/onsafety/2013/06/cpsc-science-fireworks-injuries-2013-update/