OnSafety is the Official Blog Site of the U.S. Consumer Product Safety Commission. Here you'll find the latest safety information as well as important messages that will keep you and your family safe. We hope you'll visit often!

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Before You Start Your Summer Fun, Check for These Recalled Products

Winter is finally giving way to warmer weather. This means kids are playing outside and adults are firing up their grills and working on their lawns. Now would be a good time to check on whether any of your summer products were recalled this past winter. Check out the list of recalled products below. To check other products for safety issues, go to SaferProducts.gov.

Product Photo Product Units Hazard
Char-Broil Grill
Char-Broil Recalls Patio Bistro Gas Grills 69,300 units in U.S. and 1,900 in Canada The electronic ignition on the grill can ignite unexpectedly, posing a burn hazard.
Snoopy150 Snoopy Sno-Cone Machines Recalled by LaRose Industries 102,000 units A brass rivet can fall out of the sno-cone machine’s ice-shaving cylinder and into a sno-cone, posing a risk of injury to the mouth or the teeth.
ToroMower150 Toro Recalls TimeMaster and TurfMaster Lawn Mowers 34,500 units in United States and 1,600 in Canada The mower’s blade can break and injure the user and others nearby.
Solowave Recalls Home Playground Tube Slides with Port Holes Solowave Recalls Home Playground Tube Slides with Port Holes 10,800 in the United States and 9,900 in Canada The plastic port hole-type windows in the tube slide can break, posing a laceration hazard to children.
Sterling Rope Company Recalls Sewn Cords Sterling Rope Company Recalls Sewn Cords 9,200 in the United States and 480 in Canada Sewn cords break at a lower weight than published weight values, posing a fall hazard.
Nationwide Industries Recalls Trident Pool Gate Latches Nationwide Industries Recalls Trident Pool Gate Latches 2,500 units The magnet contained in the striker portion of the latch assembly can come loose, preventing the latch from securing a gate.
Horizon Hobby Recalls Remote Controlled Model Helicopters Horizon Hobby Recalls Remote Controlled Model Helicopters 1,980 units United States and 200 in Canada The tail rotor grip used for securing the tail rotor blade to the tail rotor hub can separate and release from the helicopter, posing a risk of a crash and injury hazard.
Gas Trimmers Recalled by efco Gas Trimmers Recalled by efco 1,400 units in the United States and 166 in Canada The muffler on the trimmer’s engine can break during use and pose a fire hazard.
ClayBowl150 Nantucket Distributing Recalls Clay Bowl Outdoor Fireplaces 1,200 units When fire is lit, pieces of the clay fireplace bowl can blow off of the bowl posing impact and burn hazards
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This address for this post is: http://www.cpsc.gov/onsafety/2014/04/before-you-start-your-summer-fun-check-for-these-recalled-products/

Liquid Laundry Packets: An Update

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single-use liquid laundry packetsAbout a year and a half ago, we began warning you about dangers connected to single-load liquid laundry packets. These packets are filled with highly concentrated, toxic chemicals. A 7-month-old in Florida died from swallowing the soap.

CPSC has received about 1,230 reports of children unintentionally injuring themselves with packets. Injuries include swallowing the detergent and getting the chemical in their eyes or on their skin. The Poison Help Line reports even more: Nearly 17,500.

Several companies that make these packets—Cot ‘n Wash, Dial, Procter & Gamble, and Sun Products—have agreed to make some changes to begin addressing these safety concerns. We want you to know about these changes, as CPSC was a driving force in making them happen. Importantly, though, we believe more must be done, and we’re continuing to call on companies to build more safety into these products more quickly and more robustly.

child warning label that appears on packages.Here are some of the changes so far:

Safety standards: Makers and sellers of laundry packets have come together, along with consumer advocates and CPSC staff, to start the process of creating a voluntary consensus standard. ASTM International, a standards setting organization, is overseeing this process. The goal is for all of the members to work together, as quickly as possible, to craft a strong safety standard that meaningfully protects children from these products.

Opaque packaging: Part of the allure of these packets for young children is that they can look like familiar items such as candy, toys and teething products. Companies have changed the containers that hold the packets to be opaque.

Labels and Warnings: “Keep Out of Reach of Children” and “Keep Contents Out of Eyes” safety warning stickers and graphics have been placed in multiple places on the containers. Also, look for posters and other warnings near laundry packets in stores. Warning labels alone are not the answer, but are part of a larger system of safety.

In addition, companies are researching a switch to containers that are more difficult for children to open. Safety latches—both on containers and on cabinets—can be a deterrent to children getting access to these packets. As with all household cleaning products, make sure to keep these packets tightly closed in the original containers and out of sight and out of reach of young children.

These companies also report that they are researching chemical formulations of the laundry detergent in the packets, with the goal to find formulations that remain effective, but are less toxic.

Our hope is that these first steps for these products make them safer and that all companies that make liquid laundry packets will join these safety efforts.

Follow these safety tips if you use these products in your home:

  • Do not let children handle laundry packets
  • Do not puncture or take packets apart
  • Do not leave loose packets around – keep them stored securely in the container
  • Store out of a child’s sight and reach in their original containers
  • Keep containers closed and dry
  • Read and follow package warnings and instructions

Remember, these packets can quickly dissolve upon contact with water, wet hands and saliva. They can also rupture, releasing the chemicals into eyes. If you or your child swallows or is exposed to these chemicals, call Poison Help immediately at (800) 222-1222.

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This address for this post is: http://www.cpsc.gov/onsafety/2014/03/update-liquid-laundry-packets/

Space Saving Sleep Solutions

Celebrate African-American History MonthCabinet bed designed by Sarah E. Goode shown closed and opened.Learn more safety information about furniture, on CPSC’s furniture safety guides page Who isn’t looking for a little more space for all the stuff we acquire?

Sarah E. Goode was a furniture store owner and the first African-American woman to receive a patent. Her patent was for a space-saving, innovative solution that combined a bed and a cabinet. She received her patent for a Folding Cabinet Bed on July 14, 1885—27 years before William Lawrence Murphy patented his fold-up “Murphy Bed” design.

Goode’s bed could be folded up into a cabinet that was also a roll-top desk.  The desk had spaces for paper, writing tools and storage.

While CPSC is not aware of safety concerns with Goode’s original bed design, we keep up with the latest trends in sleep solutions and look for ways to promote bedding safety.

Today, CPSC focuses bedding safety efforts on:

At CPSC, we help make everyday products safer for you.

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This address for this post is: http://www.cpsc.gov/onsafety/2014/02/space-saving-sleep-solutions/

CPSC Infographic: Portable Generator-Related Deaths

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This infographic is also posted on CPSC’s Flickr page for easy sharing.

portable generator death information

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This address for this post is: http://www.cpsc.gov/onsafety/2014/02/cpsc-infographic-portable-generator-related-deaths/

Winter Weather Alert: Generators

Update: Jan. 6, 2014: Winter weather and extreme cold have been crossing the U.S. If you lose power, keep portable generators outside, at least 20 feet away from windows and doors. See below for more safety information. If you use a space heater to stay warm, follow these tips.

First Posted: Dec. 6, 2013

Dangerous ice and snow is sweeping across the plains, south, and heading east.  There are expected to be widespread power outages associated with this large storm.

Are you planning on using a portable gas generator to help you during or after the storm this week?

When dealing with severe winter weather and power outages some people take unnecessary risks. Do not take extra risks with your generator. It can be deadly. (Take a look at this infographic to see just how deadly.) Its invisible odorless CO exhaust can kill you and your family in just minutes.

Be safe. Put your generator:

  • OUTSIDE! Keep it at least 20 feet* away from windows and doors.
  • Do NOT put generators in garages or basements. An open door does NOT provide enough ventilation to save you from deadly carbon monoxide gas.

When you use a generator, be sure to have a working CO alarm in your home. (Note: You should do this anyway.)

Finally, know the initial symptoms of CO poisoning:

  • Headache
  • Fatigue
  • Shortness of breath
  • Nausea
  • Dizziness.

Get outside into fresh air quickly and call 911 immediately. Know what to do.

* Minimum distance recommended by the U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention.

Here’s more information on carbon monoxide.

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This address for this post is: http://www.cpsc.gov/onsafety/2014/01/winter-weather-alert-generators/