OnSafety is the Official Blog Site of the U.S. Consumer Product Safety Commission. Here you'll find the latest safety information as well as important messages that will keep you and your family safe. We hope you'll visit often!

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Winter Weather Warning: Safeguarding Against CO Poisoning with Portable Generators

Blog en español

Winter weather can knock out power in its path.

If you are considering using a gasoline-powered portable generator to temporarily power appliances and heaters to cook and stay warm, you need to know these five facts.

FACT #1: The exhaust from portable generators contains poisonous carbon monoxide (CO) which can kill you and your family in minutes.

FACT #2: NEVER use a portable generator inside your home or garage. Run the generator OUTSIDE ONLY, at least 20 feet from the house and away from your home’s windows and vents to keep those harmful fumes away.

FACT #3: Carbon monoxide is an “invisible killer.” You cannot see or smell it. It can quickly incapacitate and kill you.

FACT #4: Have working CO alarms in your home.  There should be a CO alarm outside each sleeping area and on each level of your home.

FACT #5: If a CO alarm goes off, DO NOT ignore it. Get everyone out of the house and then call 911 and let firefighters handle it.

Take precautions against carbon monoxide, the “invisible killer.” Your life depends on it.

 

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This address for this post is: http://www.cpsc.gov/onsafety/2015/01/winter-weather-warning-safeguarding-against-co-poisoning-with-portable-generators/

A Game Plan to Prevent TV/Furniture Tip-Over Deaths and Injuries

Blog en español

It is officially Super Bowl season and for many that also translates to TV buying season. According to a forthcoming study from the Consumer Electronics Association (CEA)®, more consumers report buying televisions specifically for watching the Super Bowl than for any other sporting event – almost three times that of the World Series or NBA Finals. As consumers nationwide score deals on TV sales, new research from CPSC suggests that there are some very important steps to take once the new TV is brought home.

CPSC has previously reported that one child dies every two weeks and one consumer is injured every 15 minutes when a piece of furniture or a television falls over onto them. Children will climb anything to reach a wanted item. The results of children climbing on or near furniture and TVs can and have ended in tragedy.

Falling TV

According to a new CPSC study, when a television falls from an average size dresser, it can fall with the force of thousands of pounds.  Imagine this: the impact of a falling TV is like being caught between J.J. Watt and Ndamukong Suh colliding at full-speed—10 times.  Hard hits are sure to be delivered by the New England Patriots and Seattle Seahawks on Sunday, so imagine a child being struck by a force more than 10 times as powerful as a NFL lineman.

CPSC researchers conducted 38 drop tests simulating a tip-over of both cathode ray tube (CRT) and flat screen TVs on top of furniture. Using frequently reported incident scenarios and an accelerometer to help calculate the force, the researchers concluded:

  • The impact energy was typically much greater for a CRT TV than a flat screen, but both had forces that can cause serious injury on impact;
  • for acceleration of the TV, impact was between 73 Gs and 240 Gs;
  • for CRT TVs, the impact force was up to 12,700 pounds of force; and
  • for flat screen TVs, the force was up to 2,098 pounds of force.

With an impact force equivalent to thousands of pounds, no child is a match for falling TVs or furniture. Fortunately, simple and low-cost steps can prevent tip-over incidents.

CPSC’s new “Anchor It” campaign is urging caregivers to think about four important questions before buying a new flat screen TV:

Where will the old TV be placed?

How to secure the old TV in its new location?

How to secure the TV if not mounting?

Will the new TV be mounted?

Ask a sales associate for help selecting anti-tip devices. A secured TV is mounted to the wall or anchored to furniture with straps, brackets, or braces to prevent the TV from sliding.

TV-Anchor             Wall Anchor

 And lastly, remember to keep items that might tempt kids to climb, such as toys and remote controls, from the top of the TV and furniture.

Note: our friends at Safe Kids Worldwide have turned the day before the Super Bowl into National TV Safety Day.  Check out SafeKids.org or Facebook.com/safekidsworldwide for more great safety tips.)

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This address for this post is: http://www.cpsc.gov/onsafety/2015/01/a-game-plan-to-prevent-tvfurniture-tip-over-deaths-and-injuries/

Check Your Homes for Recalled Lajobi Cribs and Glider Rockers

In 2010, the Commission issued a new federal safety standard for cribs, banning drop side cribs and ushering in a safer generation of cribs. Drop side cribs are no longer a safe place to have your infant sleep due to a danger of entrapment and suffocation. Repair kits were previously available for some recalled LaJobi products, including drop side cribs. However, LaJobi is no longer in business and repair kits are no longer available for recalled LaJobi products. Any LaJobi-made products that have been recalled should be discarded or destroyed. Most of the product recalls involve cribs, but there is also one recall involving 12 models of a glider.

Consumers with these products should immediately stop using them and destroy or discard the item. A full list of products recalled from Lajobi are listed below with links to the recalls on cpsc.gov.

PRODUCT SOLD AT PHOTO(S)
Lajobi Bonavita “Cabana” Drop-Side Cribs USA Baby, Beautiful Beginnings, Buy Buy Baby and other specialty stores nationwide from January 2006 through May 2009 for about $450. Cabana Crib
Lajobi “Molly” and “Betsy” Cribs (2001)Reannounced in 2009 Juvenile specialty stores nationwide from May 2000 through September 2001 for about $700 for the Molly model and $650 for the Betsy model. Molly CribBetsy Crib
Lajobi / Babi Italia “Tiffany” and “Josephine”  Drop-Side Cribs Babies R Us sold the recalled cribs exclusively from July 2001 through January 2003 for about $500.  tiffany or josephine crib
Lajobi / Babi Italia “Pinehurst” and Bonavita “Hudson” Drop-Side Cribs Babi Italia Pinehurst drop side cribs were sold exclusively by Babies “R” Us. Bonavita Hudson drop side cribs were sold at Baby Basics, Beautiful Beginnings, and Buy Buy Baby stores and children’s product stores nationwide for about $300. Cribs were sold from December 2006 through December 2007.  pinehurst cribhudson crib
Graco®-Branded Drop Side Cribs Made by LaJobi Children’s product stores and other retailers nationwide from February 2007 to March 2010 for between $140 and $200.Models include: Ashleigh Drop Side, Hampton Drop Side, Jason Convertible Drop Side, Kendal Drop Side, Lauren Drop Side, Rachel Convertible Drop Side, Sarah Drop Side, Shannon Drop Side, Tifton Drop Side.  Graco Branded Drop Side cribs Graco Branded Drop Side cribs Graco Branded Drop Side cribs Graco Branded Drop Side cribs Graco Branded Drop Side cribs Graco Branded Drop Side cribs Graco Branded Drop Side cribs Graco Branded Drop Side cribs Graco Branded Drop Side cribs
Bonavita, Babi Italia and ISSI Drop-Side Cribs Children’s product stores and various other retailers nationwide from May 1999 through May 2009 for between $300 and $430.  bonavita crib
Graco®-branded “Avalon Glider Rockers with Ottoman” and “Complete Nursery Solution / Katelyn” Glider Rockers The Avalon model was sold at Burlington and other mass retail stores nationwide and online at Amazon.com, Target.com and Walmart.com from December 2009 to October 2012 for about $170. The CNS Box 2 / Katelyn model was sold exclusively online at Walmart.com from November 2011 to October 2012 for about $135.   Graco gliderGraco glider
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This address for this post is: http://www.cpsc.gov/onsafety/2015/01/check-your-homes-for-recalled-lajobi-cribs-and-glider-rockers/

Home Safe Home for the Holidays

Blog en español

Stitches, slings, and crutches are not what most people envision for the holiday season. Unfortunately, for about 200 people a day, decoration-related injuries are a reality this time of year. During November and December, an estimated 13,000 consumers are treated in emergency rooms for injuries related to holiday lights, Christmas trees, ornaments and other decorations. As consumers nationwide gear up to deck out their homes for the holiday season, CPSC is warning of decorating dangers and providing tips for a safe holiday home.

Holiday ornament

 

Ornaments and Other Decorations – Take special care to avoid sharp, weighted, or breakable decorations. Keep trimmings with small removable parts out of the reach of children, who could swallow or inhale small pieces. Avoid trimmings that resemble candy or food that may tempt a child to reach for and swallow them.

 

 

Holiday candle with poinsettia

 

Candles – Keep burning candles in sight, away from places where kids and pets can reach them or knock them over. Lighted candles should be placed away from items that can catch fire, such as trees, other evergreens, decorations, curtains and furniture.

 

 

Colorful holiday lights

 

 

Holiday Lights – Check lights for the mark of an independent safety testing laboratory.  Examine new and old lights for broken or cracked sockets, frayed or bare wires, or loose connections. Do not use damaged light sets. Read additional tips on holiday lights.

 

 

Decorated Christmas tree and gifts

 

Christmas Trees – Prevent a tree fire. Check for freshness when purchasing a live tree. The needles should be hard to pull from branches and do not break when bent. Preserve the tree while it is in your home by placing it away from heat sources. Each year, there are about 200 fires in which the Christmas tree is the first item ignited. These fires result in an estimated 10 deaths, 20 injuries, and $16 million in property losses.

 

 

Family hanging exterior lights

 

Ladders – Use caution on ladders. Read “Ladder Safety 101” for tips to prevent ladder falls this season.

 

 

 

Baby toys

 

Toys – Play it Safe this holiday season. Avoid toys with small parts for children younger than age 3; purchase toys appropriate for your child’s age by following the age guidelines on the packaging; purchase helmets and other safety gear for ride-on toys; and heed product warnings and care instructions.

 

 

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This address for this post is: http://www.cpsc.gov/onsafety/2014/12/home-safe-home-for-the-holidays/

Protect Young Children from Burns on Glass Fronts of Gas Fireplaces—Use Protective Barriers

Blog en español

If you have one of theseGlass front fireplace without screen

 

and one of these in your house,Woman with young boy

you need to hear about a new way to protect the safety of you and your family.

Starting on January 1, 2015, all new gas fireplaces, and fireplace heaters that vent to the outside, will come with a protective barrier.  This barrier will be there to prevent your child and others from coming into direct contact with the glass front of the fireplace.

Gas fireplace screen

 

Why should you care?

Glass front fireplace injury from burn

You should care because the glass fronts of fireplaces can reach 500° F or even 1,000° F, and children and others can be badly burned by touching the glass.

Severe burns can happen in seconds.

 Glass front fireplace injury from burn

Numerous young children have been burned this way. You can prevent this from happening to your child.
Glass front fireplace injury from burn

Protective barriers will be standard on new gas fireplaces starting on January 1.  Make sure to use the barrier.

If you already have a fireplace, buy a protective retrofit barrier to protect your little ones from being burned. Barriers can include attachable safety screens, safety gates and fireplace safety screens like you see below.  If you choose an attachable safety screen, check with your fireplace manufacturer to get the right one for your fireplace. You can buy safety screen barriers at fireplace retailers and hardware stores and purchase safety gates at big box and/or baby product stores.

Gas fireplace screen  Two young children playing in front of a screened off fireplace  Gas fireplace with screen

In addition to the safety barrier, make sure to supervise young children around the fireplace.

We want to thank the Hearth, Patio and Barbeque Association (HPBA), which chaired the voluntary standards committee that developed the new ANSI industry standards requiring barriers. We also want to recognize Dr. Carol Pollack-Nelson, who petitioned CPSC and sparked movement on the voluntary standards to address gas fireplace-related burns to children, and also recognize the American Academy of Pediatrics (AAP) for sharing information with CPSC about the terrible burn injuries children have suffered by touching hot fireplace glass.

The HPBA and AAP have more safety information on their websites. Check them out.

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This address for this post is: http://www.cpsc.gov/onsafety/2014/12/protect-young-children-from-burns-on-glass-fronts-of-gas-fireplaces-use-protective-barriers/