OnSafety is the Official Blog Site of the U.S. Consumer Product Safety Commission. Here you'll find the latest safety information as well as important messages that will keep you and your family safe. We hope you'll visit often!

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New Stroller and Carriage Safety Standard: What It Means

Blog en español

Good news, parents! CPSC has approved a new federal safety standard that will improve the safety of all carriages and strollers sold after September 10, 2015.

From January 2008 through June 2013, CPSC staff received about 1,300 safety-related reports for children 4 years old and younger that involved strollers. The numbers, which may change in the future as more reports come into the agency, include:

  • Four deaths
  • 14 hospitalizations
  • Nearly 391 injuries

The new safety standard requires that all strollers and carriages be made, tested and labeled to minimize the hazards seen in the above incidents. These include:

  • Hinge issues that have resulted in pinched, cut, or amputated fingers or arms. These issues have the highest injury rate of all hazards associated with strollers;

  • Broken and detached wheels;
  • Parking brake failures;
  • Locking mechanism problems;
  • Restraint issues, including children being able to unbuckle themselves and broken and loose stroller seat belts;
  • Structural integrity; and
  • Stability

Once the rule takes effect, nearly all strollers sold are required to meet the new requirements. Here are just a few of the stroller types:

Different types of strollers including jogging strollers, double strollers, travel systems, single strollers, umbrella strollers, prams and wagon strollers.

Remember, buckle your child up every time you use the stroller and never leave a child unattended in a stroller. After all, falls are the cause of many injuries associated with strollers.

As Acting Chairman Bob Adler recently said, “I believe it is time that we put a strong mandatory standard in place: A federal standard that helps to ensure that a stroller ride is a safe ride for babies and an equally safe ride for toddlers.”

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This address for this post is: http://www.cpsc.gov/onsafety/2014/03/new-stroller-and-carriages-safety-standard-what-it-means/

Buying Toys – Safer Toys.

How things have changed when it comes to toy safety.  Back in 2008, 172 toys were recalled — 19 due to lead. In fiscal year 2013, there were 31 toy recalls — none were related to lead.

 

Our new global system to make toys safer means:

  • Toys are now tested by independent, third-party testing laboratories around the world.
  • CPSC and U.S. Customs and Border Patrol are at the ports, stopping toys that violate U.S. standards before they reach children’s hands. This recent video shows an example of a recent toy stoppage.
  • You can shop with confidence. Just remember to use products with care.

 

Here are some things you should know:

  • Five of the 11 toy-related deaths in 2012 occurred when children were riding tricycles.
  • Four of those children were found in pools.
  • Two other children died when they rode scooters into traffic and were unfortunately hit.

Helmets, safety gear and supervision are key for safety when children play on riding toys.

Finally, CPSC continues to be concerned with children’s access to high-powered magnet sets:

 

Here are some additional toy safety tips:

  • Keep deflated and broken balloons away from children.
  • Keep small balls and other toys with small parts away from children under 3.
  • Supervise battery charging. Pay attention to instructions and warnings on these chargers. Some chargers lack a mechanism to prevent overcharging.
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This address for this post is: http://www.cpsc.gov/onsafety/2013/12/buying-toys-safer-toys/

Baby Movement Monitor Recall: A Cord Issue

Angelcare Movement and Sound Sensor MonitorWe’ve said it before and we’ll say it again: Kids and cords are a dangerous mix! No matter the product—baby monitors, window coverings, or baby movement monitors —cords in little hands can end up strangling a child.

We’re reminding you because today CPSC, in cooperation with Angelcare Monitors Inc., is announcing a recall to repair movement and sound baby monitors after two deaths. A cord attaches the baby monitor sensor pad under the crib mattress with the nursery monitor unit. This cord poses a strangulation risk if the child pulls the cord into the crib and the cord becomes wrapped around the child’s neck.

Angelcare is providing cord covers for Angelcare Movement and Sound Monitors with Sensor pads. These cord covers are designed to prevent a child from pulling the cord into the crib. Make sure to contact Angelcare at (855)355-2643 or www.angelcarebaby.com to get a free cord cover.

Angelcare Movement and Sound Baby Monitor with rigid strips repair kit installed

Angelcare Movement and Sound Baby Monitor with rigid strips repair kit installed

As for those traditional baby monitor cords, we continue to recommend that you keep these cords and monitors at least 3 feet away from your baby’s crib. Here’s a video that shows why:

 

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This address for this post is: http://www.cpsc.gov/onsafety/2013/11/baby-movement-monitor-recall-a-cord-issue/

Dads’ Guide To “Fix” the Kids!

Blog in Spanish

Hey Dads, we hear you! Fatherhood is exciting and joyous and a crazy new world. Navigating the life of your baby or toddler is full of wonderful moments—and some hurdles. To help you clear and even avoid some of those hurdles, we have a safety game plan to share with you. Check out these simple safeguards for your little one:

    • 1. Bare is Best for the safety of your baby’s sleep environment. Your baby can be cozy without the clutter. Never place pillows, quilts or comforters in your baby’s crib, bassinet or play yard.
    • 2. You can’t always fix it. Duct tape and your tool box are tempting, but NEVER try to fix a crib that is broken and in disrepair. Cribs made after June 28, 2011, have to be tested to make sure they meet the most stringent performance and testing requirements in the world. Discard and destroy cribs made before that date. Your child’s crib should be the safest product in your home.
    • 3. Anchor and Protect. Here’s where your tools come into play. Install anchors or straps on your television and other furniture. Kids like to climb, often to get a remote or toy placed up high. Even furniture that appears stable may not be when placed on carpet or when a toddler pulls out all the drawers to scamper up.

Get more safety information daily by following us @OnSafety on Twitter and on Google+.

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This address for this post is: http://www.cpsc.gov/onsafety/2013/10/dads-guide-to-fix-the-kids/

The Sounds of Trampoline Safety

Blog in Spanish

Jump, bounce, squeal.  These are the happy sounds of a child playing on a trampoline in the backyard. Girl bouncing on trampoline

In between bounces a young child calls out to his friend, “Join me.”

The friend races out to the backyard and bounds onto the trampoline.

The sound of an “uh-oh” about to happen.

Only one person should be on a trampoline at a time.

Then, THUD.

The noise you don’t want to hear, typically followed by a child crying.

While just playing in and around the house, children often stub their fingers, bonk their heads, and fall down—all minor injuries.

Getting hurt on a trampoline can be much worse.

Last year, about 95,000 people suffered injuries of such a serious nature that there were taken to an emergency room for treatment.  Between 2000 and 2009, 22 families lost a loved one from a trampoline mishap.

Installing and maintaining the enclosure around the trampolines and being aware that children younger than 5 are at the greatest risk of injury can make for a safer experience in the back yard.

Zip, cover, scoot.  These are the sounds of you making the trampoline a safer place to play.

  • Zip up the surrounding enclosure.
  • Cover the springs, hooks and frame in shock-absorbing pads.
  • Scoot the trampoline away from structures and trees.

Help minimize the risks of trampoline play.  Learn more on our Trampoline Safety Alert page.

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This address for this post is: http://www.cpsc.gov/onsafety/2013/07/the-sounds-of-trampoline-safety/