OnSafety is the Official Blog Site of the U.S. Consumer Product Safety Commission. Here you'll find the latest safety information as well as important messages that will keep you and your family safe. We hope you'll visit often!

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Baby Movement Monitor Recall: A Cord Issue

Angelcare Movement and Sound Sensor MonitorWe’ve said it before and we’ll say it again: Kids and cords are a dangerous mix! No matter the product—baby monitors, window coverings, or baby movement monitors —cords in little hands can end up strangling a child.

We’re reminding you because today CPSC, in cooperation with Angelcare Monitors Inc., is announcing a recall to repair movement and sound baby monitors after two deaths. A cord attaches the baby monitor sensor pad under the crib mattress with the nursery monitor unit. This cord poses a strangulation risk if the child pulls the cord into the crib and the cord becomes wrapped around the child’s neck.

Angelcare is providing cord covers for Angelcare Movement and Sound Monitors with Sensor pads. These cord covers are designed to prevent a child from pulling the cord into the crib. Make sure to contact Angelcare at (855)355-2643 or www.angelcarebaby.com to get a free cord cover.

Angelcare Movement and Sound Baby Monitor with rigid strips repair kit installed

Angelcare Movement and Sound Baby Monitor with rigid strips repair kit installed

As for those traditional baby monitor cords, we continue to recommend that you keep these cords and monitors at least 3 feet away from your baby’s crib. Here’s a video that shows why:

 

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This address for this post is: http://www.cpsc.gov/onsafety/2013/11/baby-movement-monitor-recall-a-cord-issue/

Dads’ Guide To “Fix” the Kids!

Blog in Spanish

Hey Dads, we hear you! Fatherhood is exciting and joyous and a crazy new world. Navigating the life of your baby or toddler is full of wonderful moments—and some hurdles. To help you clear and even avoid some of those hurdles, we have a safety game plan to share with you. Check out these simple safeguards for your little one:

    • 1. Bare is Best for the safety of your baby’s sleep environment. Your baby can be cozy without the clutter. Never place pillows, quilts or comforters in your baby’s crib, bassinet or play yard.
    • 2. You can’t always fix it. Duct tape and your tool box are tempting, but NEVER try to fix a crib that is broken and in disrepair. Cribs made after June 28, 2011, have to be tested to make sure they meet the most stringent performance and testing requirements in the world. Discard and destroy cribs made before that date. Your child’s crib should be the safest product in your home.
    • 3. Anchor and Protect. Here’s where your tools come into play. Install anchors or straps on your television and other furniture. Kids like to climb, often to get a remote or toy placed up high. Even furniture that appears stable may not be when placed on carpet or when a toddler pulls out all the drawers to scamper up.

Get more safety information daily by following us @OnSafety on Twitter and on Google+.

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This address for this post is: http://www.cpsc.gov/onsafety/2013/10/dads-guide-to-fix-the-kids/

The Sounds of Trampoline Safety

Blog in Spanish

Jump, bounce, squeal.  These are the happy sounds of a child playing on a trampoline in the backyard. Girl bouncing on trampoline

In between bounces a young child calls out to his friend, “Join me.”

The friend races out to the backyard and bounds onto the trampoline.

The sound of an “uh-oh” about to happen.

Only one person should be on a trampoline at a time.

Then, THUD.

The noise you don’t want to hear, typically followed by a child crying.

While just playing in and around the house, children often stub their fingers, bonk their heads, and fall down—all minor injuries.

Getting hurt on a trampoline can be much worse.

Last year, about 95,000 people suffered injuries of such a serious nature that there were taken to an emergency room for treatment.  Between 2000 and 2009, 22 families lost a loved one from a trampoline mishap.

Installing and maintaining the enclosure around the trampolines and being aware that children younger than 5 are at the greatest risk of injury can make for a safer experience in the back yard.

Zip, cover, scoot.  These are the sounds of you making the trampoline a safer place to play.

  • Zip up the surrounding enclosure.
  • Cover the springs, hooks and frame in shock-absorbing pads.
  • Scoot the trampoline away from structures and trees.

Help minimize the risks of trampoline play.  Learn more on our Trampoline Safety Alert page.

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This address for this post is: http://www.cpsc.gov/onsafety/2013/07/the-sounds-of-trampoline-safety/

Dec. 28: Crib Standard Deadline Fast Approaching

The deadline for child care centers, hotels, motels and places of public accommodation to comply with the new crib standards is coming up.

As a refresher: Beginning June 28, 2011, there are new new federal safety standards for cribs. All cribs made and sold after that date must meet these new standards, which prohibit traditional drop-side cribs, strengthen crib slats and mattress supports, improve the quality of hardware, and require more rigorous testing from entering the marketplace.

Cribs provided by child care facilities, family child care homes, hotels, motels and other places of public accommodation have until Dec. 28, 2012, to meet the requirements of the new standards.

Here are some materials that we have created to help you understand the new standards and what you need to do:

In addition, we continue to receive questions about the new standard. Many of your questions revolve around evacuation cribs and play yards.

Evacuation Cribs

Cribs in child care facilities, family child care homes and places of public accommodation must meet the requirements of the new federal safety standards for full-size or non-full-size cribs. The regulations do not offer any exemptions or exceptions for evacuation cribs, regardless of how they are used.

Play Yards

The new crib standards do not apply to play yards. CPSC recently strengthened the safety standards for play yards. This new standard will take effect in February 2013. From CPSC’s regulatory perspective, a play yard can be used in lieu of a crib. HOWEVER, some state regulations prohibit the use of play yards in lieu of cribs in a child care setting. If you choose to replace the cribs in your child care with play yards, please familiarize yourself with your state regulations.

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This address for this post is: http://www.cpsc.gov/onsafety/2012/12/dec-28-crib-standard-deadline-fast-approaching/

Fix Your Stroller; Avoid These Common Problems

Are you planning on buying or getting a used stroller from a thrift store, yard sale or a friend? Do you own one?

We have seen some recurring safety incidents involving strollers. One involves the opening between the grab bar or tray and the seat bottom. The other involves fingertip amputations.

Baby trapped between the tray and seat of a strollerLet’s start with the opening. In some older strollers, the opening between the grab bar or tray and the seat bottom is less than 8 inches. This can be a big hazard for babies up to 1 year old. When a baby is not properly harnessed, his or her body can slide down through the opening, but their head and neck get trapped.

CPSC is aware of 30 deaths since 1980 in which a child’s head or neck got trapped between the tray or grab bar and the seat bottom.

Many companies have recalled older strollers because of this risk. For these recalled strollers, there is an easy fix. You simply call the company to get a free repair kit or a replacement piece that prevents a child from slipping through the opening.

Here’s a list of companies supplying this fix for the openings on their recalled strollers:

Graco Quattro™ and MetroLite™ Strollers

Peg Perego Venezia and Pliko-P3 Strollers

Tike Tech  Single City X3 and X3 Sport Jogging Strollers

Valco Baby Tri Mode Single and Twin Jogging Strollers

Zooper Strollers

In addition, owners of Bumbleride Indie or Indie Twin strollers with an adjustable bumper bar manufactured from January 2009 through August 2011 should never set the bar in the intermediate (car seat) position when a child is seated in the stroller.

If you’re about to purchase a used stroller, make sure the opening between the grab bar or tray and the seat opening is 8 inches or more. And check for recalls on SaferProducts.gov or on our Recalls.gov mobile app (for Droid) before you buy. It’s illegal to sell a recalled product.

Whenever you put your baby in a stroller, use the safety harness. This can prevent a baby from slipping and can save a baby’s life. Infants as young as a few weeks old can move around when they sleep. If a baby is sleeping in the stroller without the harness, he or she can slide down to the opening. This is one reason you should never leave a baby, particularly one younger than 12 months old, unattended in the stroller. That’s especially true if the stroller seat’s backrest is in the reclined or flat position.

* * *

Now, let’s turn our attention to fingers. CPSC is aware of at least 23 incidents of fingertip amputations in strollers between 2008 and April 2012 among children under the age of 5. In many cases, children 3 or younger suffered full or partial amputations when their fingers got caught in a hinge. In addition, adults have gotten their fingers caught, too. Amputations typically happen in one of several ways:

  • Hinge cover on a strollerYou are using a stroller and a latch stops working, causing the stroller to unexpectedly collapse.
  • A child is standing next to or begins to climb into the stroller while a caregiver is unfolding or opening the stroller.
  • You lift a collapsed stroller, such as picking it up out of the trunk of a car. One side of the frame unexpectedly unfolds.
  • Your finger gets caught in a hinge when you fold or unfold the stroller.

Several companies have recalled their strollers to give caregivers free hinge covers that block fingers from getting caught.

If you have or are buying one of these strollers secondhand, make sure that you have the hinge cover:

Britax “Blink” single umbrella strollers

CYBEX Ruby, Onyx and Topaz model umbrella strollers

Graco Passage™, Alano™ and Spree™ Strollers and Travel Systems | Video

Maclaren single and double umbrella strollers sold before November 2009 | Video

Kolcraft Contours Options three- and four-wheeled strollers

phil&teds USA sport v2 and classic v1 single-seat jogging strollers

Whenever you open or close a stroller or one of its parts, like the canopy, keep your child’s hands away. Here are a few suggestions:

  • Hand the child a cup or toy to hold.
  • Play “hands up” as you open the stroller and “hands down” as you open the canopy.
  • Sing a counting song before your child can get into the stroller. “One, two, touch your shoe; three, four, stroller’s ready; five, six, time to sit.” Open the stroller while you are counting.

Tweet other ideas that promote stroller safety to @OnSafety and we’ll retweet some of our favorites.

Reader Note: Blog originally published on June 14, 2012. Updated July 24, 2012

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This address for this post is: http://www.cpsc.gov/onsafety/2012/07/fix-your-stroller-avoid-these-common-problems/