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Anchor It and Protect a Child

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The Tragic Truth

In December 2012, we posted an OnSafety blog, warning of furniture, television and appliance-related tip-over incidents. At that time, CPSC reported nearly 350 deaths, most involving young children. Since then, more than 80 people have died when a dresser, TV, bookcase, table, appliance or other large item tipped over and fell on them. A new report from our staff indicates that 430 tragic deaths occurred between 2000 and 2013, and an estimated 38,000 annual injuries, many of which were serious, from 2011 through 2013.

In most of the incidents, a child was crushed by the product or struck on the head by the product. What is remarkable is the number of families who have turned tragedy into advocacy.  Jackie Collas, a Philadelphia-area resident, is using social media to honor her son, Curren, and encourage parents to anchor their furniture.  Lisa Seifert of Chicago created Shane’s Foundation to honor her precious son and to increase awareness, education and safety [www.shanesfoundation.org/SafetyInYourHome.html].

The Good News

anchor

By anchoring large furniture, televisions and appliances, these terrible tragedies can be prevented.  As we say at CPSC, “Anchor it and Protect a Child.”

An Internet search of “anti-tip brackets” resulted in dozens of inexpensive options for consumers to anchor furniture, televisions and appliances. Prices for the devices range in price from $5 to $20. These devices are easy to install and unobtrusive. Most anti-tip brackets have some type of quick-release feature that allows homeowners to move furniture temporarily for cleaning or other maintenance.

New furniture, TVs, and appliances often come with an anti-tip device. When making a purchase, ask your salesperson before you leave the store about how to anchor the item.

The Next Step

When you get the new items home, install anchoring devices right away. When installing a new TV, CPSC recommends that you anchor not only the TV, but also the stand, bureau or dresser on which the TV sits. Secure the TV to the base product, and secure the base product to the wall.

Now that your new TV is anchored, where are you going to put the old TV? According to our new study, about 45 percent of tip-over fatalities involving a television occur in bedrooms.

So, if you’re planning to move the old box television into your child’s bedroom or into the family room, consider that statistic—and then think, plan, and decide how to prevent a tip-over incident. Place the television on a base that is appropriate for the size, weight, and width of the television.  Anchor the television to the base and anchor both items to the wall to avoid a tip-over incident.

Children like to climb. In fact, about one-third of child fatalities involving a television occur when children climb onto the stand or dresser holding the TV. The children are often trying to reach a remote control, toy, juice box or some other item. Keep items like these, away from where children will try to climb and access them. If you have young children, the best idea may be to leave that old television on the floor.

Do you have a rental agreement or home design that prevents wall anchoring? Anchor the television to a low, sturdy base, as far back on the base as possible.

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This address for this post is: http://www.cpsc.gov/onsafety/2014/09/anchor-it-and-protect-a-child/

Who’s looking after baby?

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As parents and caregivers, keeping your baby safe is always your number one priority.baby

Pediatricians are available for great advice on the health and safety of our babies including fevers, feedings, diaper rash and even car seat safety!

There are also additional sources available when it comes to the safety of our babies that you may not always think of.

There are three federal agencies responsible for keeping the most vulnerable bundles of joy safe along with our health professionals.

Federal partners—the Eunice Kennedy Shriver National Institute of Child Health and Human Development (NICHD) of the National Institutes of Health (NIH), Health Resources and Services Administration (HRSA), and the Consumer Product Safety Commission (CPSC) – have been working for decades to reduce infant deaths and injuries and keep babies safe.

SafeToSleep---LOGO1

The Safe to Sleep® campaign, led by NICHD, in collaboration with HRSA and several other organizations and in partnership with CPSC, has a wealth of downloadable resources for creating a safe space for babies and reducing the risk of SIDS and other sleep-related causes of infant death.

Our three agencies all recommend that babies 1) be placed on their back to sleep, 2) the sleep environment be kept free of clutter that can cause suffocation, such as pillows, quilts, comforters, and cushions; and 3) be placed to sleep in a crib, bassinet, or play yard that meet new and stronger safety standards.

These Safe to Sleep® materials can be shared with other parents, caregivers, grandparents, and health and child care providers.

Check out http://safetosleep.nichd.nih.gov for more Safe to Sleep® resources.

Find out more about baby product safety recalls and updates to nursery product standards at www.cpsc.gov/cribs.

Finally, learn more about resources available for your community including health and child care providers at www.hrsa.gov.

Together, we CAN keep baby safe.

NIHNICHDHRSA

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This address for this post is: http://www.cpsc.gov/onsafety/2014/09/whos-looking-after-baby/

Millions More IKEA Children’s Lamps Recalled

Blog en español

Did you buy a children’s wall-mounted lamp or nightlight from IKEA? So did a lot of people. Take some time today to see if your child’s light is recalled.

IKEA is recalling about 3.5 million lamps in the U.S., 1.4 million in Canada and 30.2 million worldwide. Children can get tangled and strangle in the electrical cord that hangs from the lamp.

IKEA previously recalled some of these lamps in December 2013. As we reported then, two children, a 16-month-old and a 15-month-old, got tangled in the lamp’s cord while the children were in their cribs. One child died, the other nearly strangled. In both of these instances, which happened in Europe, the children pulled the lamp cords into the crib.

Twenty seven styles of lamps and nightlights are included in the IKEA lamp recall expansion. Here are some of them:

different models of recalled IKEA children's lamps

Take down these lamps until you get and install the free repair kit from IKEA. The repair kit includes self-adhesive fasteners to attach the lamp’s cord to the wall. Here’s IKEA’s contact information:

  • Toll-free phone: (888) 966-4532 anytime
  • Online at www.ikea-usa.com and click on the Recall link at the top of the page for more information.
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This address for this post is: http://www.cpsc.gov/onsafety/2014/04/millions-more-ikea-childrens-lamps-recalled/

Expansion Recall of Rechargeable Batteries Used in Summer Infant Video Monitors

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You may have missed the first notice, but if you use a Summer Infant video baby monitor, be sure to check your nursery to see if you have one of the models with the recalled rechargeable batteries. This recall has been expanded to include an additional 740,000 units and there have been additional incident reports. The monitor’s rechargeable batteries can overheat, cause burns or even property damage.

Today’s announcement from CPSC and Summer Infant includes more than 20 models of Summer Infant handheld color video monitors. Check the recall for specific model and date codes included.

Summer Infant video baby monitor and warning label

Summer Infant is providing a postage paid envelope to return the batteries in exchange for a free replacement battery.

Stop using the video monitors immediately, remove the batteries and contact Summer Infant at (800) 426-8627 to get the free replacement battery. The monitor can continue to be used on AC power with the power cord. Help get the word out about the recall and encourage caregivers, grandparents and child care centers to take advantage of the recall remedy.

We’re also reminding you that you can get direct email notification about product recall announcements on CPSC’s email subscription page.

As for those traditional baby monitor cords, we urge you to keep these cords at least 3 feet away from your baby’s crib to avoid a strangulation hazard. Here’s a video that shows why:

 

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This address for this post is: http://www.cpsc.gov/onsafety/2014/04/expansion-recall-of-rechargeable-batteries-used-in-summer-infant-video-monitors/

New Children’s Safety Standard: Soft Infant and Toddler Carriers

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Mother carrying baby in soft infant carrierCPSC is continuing to make great progress with our child safety work to establish federal safety rules for infant and toddler products. The newest one, which takes effect Sept. 29, 2014, is for soft infant and toddler carriers.

A soft carrier is usually made of sewn fabric and holds a child upright. It is designed to be worn by a caregiver. Soft carriers are typically meant for full-term babies who weigh seven pounds or more through toddlers up to 45 pounds.

The new regulation requires that all new soft infant carriers will be tested to meet safety standards. Some key safety requirements are:

  • Leg openings are designed to prevent an infant from falling through them.
  • The carrier can hold the weight that it’s advertising.
  • The fasteners and straps are designed so that they won’t come apart while a caregiver is holding a child.
  • All soft carriers must contain a warning label about fall and suffocation risks with the product.

CPSC received nearly 125 incident reports—including four deaths—related to soft infant and toddler carriers between January 1999 and July 15, 2013.

Whether your child is placed in a crib, a stroller, or a babywearing product, we want you to have confidence that these products are covered by strong safety standards.

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This address for this post is: http://www.cpsc.gov/onsafety/2014/04/new-childrens-safety-standard-soft-infant-and-toddler-carriers/