OnSafety is the Official Blog Site of the U.S. Consumer Product Safety Commission. Here you'll find the latest safety information as well as important messages that will keep you and your family safe. We hope you'll visit often!

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Millions More IKEA Children’s Lamps Recalled

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Did you buy a children’s wall-mounted lamp or nightlight from IKEA? So did a lot of people. Take some time today to see if your child’s light is recalled.

IKEA is recalling about 3.5 million lamps in the U.S., 1.4 million in Canada and 30.2 million worldwide. Children can get tangled and strangle in the electrical cord that hangs from the lamp.

IKEA previously recalled some of these lamps in December 2013. As we reported then, two children, a 16-month-old and a 15-month-old, got tangled in the lamp’s cord while the children were in their cribs. One child died, the other nearly strangled. In both of these instances, which happened in Europe, the children pulled the lamp cords into the crib.

Twenty seven styles of lamps and nightlights are included in the IKEA lamp recall expansion. Here are some of them:

different models of recalled IKEA children's lamps

Take down these lamps until you get and install the free repair kit from IKEA. The repair kit includes self-adhesive fasteners to attach the lamp’s cord to the wall. Here’s IKEA’s contact information:

  • Toll-free phone: (888) 966-4532 anytime
  • Online at www.ikea-usa.com and click on the Recall link at the top of the page for more information.
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This address for this post is: http://www.cpsc.gov/onsafety/2014/04/millions-more-ikea-childrens-lamps-recalled/

Expansion Recall of Rechargeable Batteries Used in Summer Infant Video Monitors

Blog en español

You may have missed the first notice, but if you use a Summer Infant video baby monitor, be sure to check your nursery to see if you have one of the models with the recalled rechargeable batteries. This recall has been expanded to include an additional 740,000 units and there have been additional incident reports. The monitor’s rechargeable batteries can overheat, cause burns or even property damage.

Today’s announcement from CPSC and Summer Infant includes more than 20 models of Summer Infant handheld color video monitors. Check the recall for specific model and date codes included.

Summer Infant video baby monitor and warning label

Summer Infant is providing a postage paid envelope to return the batteries in exchange for a free replacement battery.

Stop using the video monitors immediately, remove the batteries and contact Summer Infant at (800) 426-8627 to get the free replacement battery. The monitor can continue to be used on AC power with the power cord. Help get the word out about the recall and encourage caregivers, grandparents and child care centers to take advantage of the recall remedy.

We’re also reminding you that you can get direct email notification about product recall announcements on CPSC’s email subscription page.

As for those traditional baby monitor cords, we urge you to keep these cords at least 3 feet away from your baby’s crib to avoid a strangulation hazard. Here’s a video that shows why:

 

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This address for this post is: http://www.cpsc.gov/onsafety/2014/04/expansion-recall-of-rechargeable-batteries-used-in-summer-infant-video-monitors/

New Children’s Safety Standard: Soft Infant and Toddler Carriers

Blog en español

Mother carrying baby in soft infant carrierCPSC is continuing to make great progress with our child safety work to establish federal safety rules for infant and toddler products. The newest one, which takes effect Sept. 29, 2014, is for soft infant and toddler carriers.

A soft carrier is usually made of sewn fabric and holds a child upright. It is designed to be worn by a caregiver. Soft carriers are typically meant for full-term babies who weigh seven pounds or more through toddlers up to 45 pounds.

The new regulation requires that all new soft infant carriers will be tested to meet safety standards. Some key safety requirements are:

  • Leg openings are designed to prevent an infant from falling through them.
  • The carrier can hold the weight that it’s advertising.
  • The fasteners and straps are designed so that they won’t come apart while a caregiver is holding a child.
  • All soft carriers must contain a warning label about fall and suffocation risks with the product.

CPSC received nearly 125 incident reports—including four deaths—related to soft infant and toddler carriers between January 1999 and July 15, 2013.

Whether your child is placed in a crib, a stroller, or a babywearing product, we want you to have confidence that these products are covered by strong safety standards.

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This address for this post is: http://www.cpsc.gov/onsafety/2014/04/new-childrens-safety-standard-soft-infant-and-toddler-carriers/

New Stroller and Carriage Safety Standard: What It Means

Blog en español

Good news, parents! CPSC has approved a new federal safety standard that will improve the safety of all carriages and strollers sold after September 10, 2015.

From January 2008 through June 2013, CPSC staff received about 1,300 safety-related reports for children 4 years old and younger that involved strollers. The numbers, which may change in the future as more reports come into the agency, include:

  • Four deaths
  • 14 hospitalizations
  • Nearly 391 injuries

The new safety standard requires that all strollers and carriages be made, tested and labeled to minimize the hazards seen in the above incidents. These include:

  • Hinge issues that have resulted in pinched, cut, or amputated fingers or arms. These issues have the highest injury rate of all hazards associated with strollers;

  • Broken and detached wheels;
  • Parking brake failures;
  • Locking mechanism problems;
  • Restraint issues, including children being able to unbuckle themselves and broken and loose stroller seat belts;
  • Structural integrity; and
  • Stability

Once the rule takes effect, nearly all strollers sold are required to meet the new requirements. Here are just a few of the stroller types:

Different types of strollers including jogging strollers, double strollers, travel systems, single strollers, umbrella strollers, prams and wagon strollers.

Remember, buckle your child up every time you use the stroller and never leave a child unattended in a stroller. After all, falls are the cause of many injuries associated with strollers.

As Acting Chairman Bob Adler recently said, “I believe it is time that we put a strong mandatory standard in place: A federal standard that helps to ensure that a stroller ride is a safe ride for babies and an equally safe ride for toddlers.”

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This address for this post is: http://www.cpsc.gov/onsafety/2014/03/new-stroller-and-carriages-safety-standard-what-it-means/

Buying Toys – Safer Toys.

How things have changed when it comes to toy safety.  Back in 2008, 172 toys were recalled — 19 due to lead. In fiscal year 2013, there were 31 toy recalls — none were related to lead.

 

Our new global system to make toys safer means:

  • Toys are now tested by independent, third-party testing laboratories around the world.
  • CPSC and U.S. Customs and Border Patrol are at the ports, stopping toys that violate U.S. standards before they reach children’s hands. This recent video shows an example of a recent toy stoppage.
  • You can shop with confidence. Just remember to use products with care.

 

Here are some things you should know:

  • Five of the 11 toy-related deaths in 2012 occurred when children were riding tricycles.
  • Four of those children were found in pools.
  • Two other children died when they rode scooters into traffic and were unfortunately hit.

Helmets, safety gear and supervision are key for safety when children play on riding toys.

Finally, CPSC continues to be concerned with children’s access to high-powered magnet sets:

 

Here are some additional toy safety tips:

  • Keep deflated and broken balloons away from children.
  • Keep small balls and other toys with small parts away from children under 3.
  • Supervise battery charging. Pay attention to instructions and warnings on these chargers. Some chargers lack a mechanism to prevent overcharging.
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This address for this post is: http://www.cpsc.gov/onsafety/2013/12/buying-toys-safer-toys/