OnSafety is the Official Blog Site of the U.S. Consumer Product Safety Commission. Here you'll find the latest safety information as well as important messages that will keep you and your family safe. We hope you'll visit often!

Welcome!

A Game Plan to Prevent TV/Furniture Tip-Over Deaths and Injuries

Blog en español

It is officially Super Bowl season and for many that also translates to TV buying season. According to a forthcoming study from the Consumer Electronics Association (CEA)®, more consumers report buying televisions specifically for watching the Super Bowl than for any other sporting event – almost three times that of the World Series or NBA Finals. As consumers nationwide score deals on TV sales, new research from CPSC suggests that there are some very important steps to take once the new TV is brought home.

CPSC has previously reported that one child dies every two weeks and one consumer is injured every 15 minutes when a piece of furniture or a television falls over onto them. Children will climb anything to reach a wanted item. The results of children climbing on or near furniture and TVs can and have ended in tragedy.

Falling TV

According to a new CPSC study, when a television falls from an average size dresser, it can fall with the force of thousands of pounds.  Imagine this: the impact of a falling TV is like being caught between J.J. Watt and Ndamukong Suh colliding at full-speed—10 times.  Hard hits are sure to be delivered by the New England Patriots and Seattle Seahawks on Sunday, so imagine a child being struck by a force more than 10 times as powerful as a NFL lineman.

CPSC researchers conducted 38 drop tests simulating a tip-over of both cathode ray tube (CRT) and flat screen TVs on top of furniture. Using frequently reported incident scenarios and an accelerometer to help calculate the force, the researchers concluded:

  • The impact energy was typically much greater for a CRT TV than a flat screen, but both had forces that can cause serious injury on impact;
  • for acceleration of the TV, impact was between 73 Gs and 240 Gs;
  • for CRT TVs, the impact force was up to 12,700 pounds of force; and
  • for flat screen TVs, the force was up to 2,098 pounds of force.

With an impact force equivalent to thousands of pounds, no child is a match for falling TVs or furniture. Fortunately, simple and low-cost steps can prevent tip-over incidents.

CPSC’s new “Anchor It” campaign is urging caregivers to think about four important questions before buying a new flat screen TV:

Where will the old TV be placed?

How to secure the old TV in its new location?

How to secure the TV if not mounting?

Will the new TV be mounted?

Ask a sales associate for help selecting anti-tip devices. A secured TV is mounted to the wall or anchored to furniture with straps, brackets, or braces to prevent the TV from sliding.

TV-Anchor             Wall Anchor

 And lastly, remember to keep items that might tempt kids to climb, such as toys and remote controls, from the top of the TV and furniture.

Note: our friends at Safe Kids Worldwide have turned the day before the Super Bowl into National TV Safety Day.  Check out SafeKids.org or Facebook.com/safekidsworldwide for more great safety tips.)

Bookmark and Share

This address for this post is: http://www.cpsc.gov/onsafety/2015/01/a-game-plan-to-prevent-tvfurniture-tip-over-deaths-and-injuries/

Check Your Homes for Recalled Lajobi Cribs and Glider Rockers

In 2010, the Commission issued a new federal safety standard for cribs, banning drop side cribs and ushering in a safer generation of cribs. Drop side cribs are no longer a safe place to have your infant sleep due to a danger of entrapment and suffocation. Repair kits were previously available for some recalled LaJobi products, including drop side cribs. However, LaJobi is no longer in business and repair kits are no longer available for recalled LaJobi products. Any LaJobi-made products that have been recalled should be discarded or destroyed. Most of the product recalls involve cribs, but there is also one recall involving 12 models of a glider.

Consumers with these products should immediately stop using them and destroy or discard the item. A full list of products recalled from Lajobi are listed below with links to the recalls on cpsc.gov.

PRODUCT SOLD AT PHOTO(S)
Lajobi Bonavita “Cabana” Drop-Side Cribs USA Baby, Beautiful Beginnings, Buy Buy Baby and other specialty stores nationwide from January 2006 through May 2009 for about $450. Cabana Crib
Lajobi “Molly” and “Betsy” Cribs (2001)Reannounced in 2009 Juvenile specialty stores nationwide from May 2000 through September 2001 for about $700 for the Molly model and $650 for the Betsy model. Molly CribBetsy Crib
Lajobi / Babi Italia “Tiffany” and “Josephine”  Drop-Side Cribs Babies R Us sold the recalled cribs exclusively from July 2001 through January 2003 for about $500.  tiffany or josephine crib
Lajobi / Babi Italia “Pinehurst” and Bonavita “Hudson” Drop-Side Cribs Babi Italia Pinehurst drop side cribs were sold exclusively by Babies “R” Us. Bonavita Hudson drop side cribs were sold at Baby Basics, Beautiful Beginnings, and Buy Buy Baby stores and children’s product stores nationwide for about $300. Cribs were sold from December 2006 through December 2007.  pinehurst cribhudson crib
Graco®-Branded Drop Side Cribs Made by LaJobi Children’s product stores and other retailers nationwide from February 2007 to March 2010 for between $140 and $200.Models include: Ashleigh Drop Side, Hampton Drop Side, Jason Convertible Drop Side, Kendal Drop Side, Lauren Drop Side, Rachel Convertible Drop Side, Sarah Drop Side, Shannon Drop Side, Tifton Drop Side.  Graco Branded Drop Side cribs Graco Branded Drop Side cribs Graco Branded Drop Side cribs Graco Branded Drop Side cribs Graco Branded Drop Side cribs Graco Branded Drop Side cribs Graco Branded Drop Side cribs Graco Branded Drop Side cribs Graco Branded Drop Side cribs
Bonavita, Babi Italia and ISSI Drop-Side Cribs Children’s product stores and various other retailers nationwide from May 1999 through May 2009 for between $300 and $430.  bonavita crib
Graco®-branded “Avalon Glider Rockers with Ottoman” and “Complete Nursery Solution / Katelyn” Glider Rockers The Avalon model was sold at Burlington and other mass retail stores nationwide and online at Amazon.com, Target.com and Walmart.com from December 2009 to October 2012 for about $170. The CNS Box 2 / Katelyn model was sold exclusively online at Walmart.com from November 2011 to October 2012 for about $135.   Graco gliderGraco glider
Bookmark and Share

This address for this post is: http://www.cpsc.gov/onsafety/2015/01/check-your-homes-for-recalled-lajobi-cribs-and-glider-rockers/

New Safety Standards to Keep your New Baby Safer in the New Year

Smiling baby with Happy New year hat
Expecting a new baby in the New Year? Overwhelmed with where to begin? Well, there is exciting news about nursery products. Over the past few years the U.S. Consumer Product Safety Commission (CPSC) has strengthened nursery product standards to ensure safer products in the marketplace.

 

 

 

 

 

Here’s what CPSC has been doing to help keep babies safe:

New crib standards
CRIBS: All cribs sold in the U.S. with a manufacture date after June 28, 2011 must meet new federal requirements before being sold. These rules prohibit traditional drop-side rails, strengthen crib slats and mattress supports, and improve the quality of hardware—all through more stringent testing requirements.

CRADLES/BASSINETS: All cradles and bassinets manufactured or imported on or after April 23, 2014 must meet the new standard. The new standard addresses risks not previously covered such as mattress flatness stability.

New play yard standards

PLAY YARDS: As of February 28, 2013, testing for play yards became more rigorous. Play yards must meet new safety standards that prevent entrapments, eliminate sharp-edged cracks and side rail collapse or forming a V when folded to prevent strangulation.

STROLLERS: A new standard for strollers and carriages becomes effective on September 25, 2015. Hazards addressed in the standard include the prevention of head entrapments, falls, pinching, cuts and amputations.

A new report from CPSC found that about 75,000 children were treated in emergency departments nationwide in 2013 due to injuries associated with, but not necessarily caused by, nursery products.  Tragically, more 100 children younger than age 5 die each year from nursery products.  The majority of injuries were caused by falls, while positional asphyxia (when a baby cannot get enough air due to his/her position), strangulation, and drowning were among the leading causes of death. Some fatalities were attributed to the product and others resulted from hazards such as clutter and soft bedding in a child’s sleep environment.

Here’s what you can do:

  1. Remember! Never add clutter, such as pillows, quilts or comforters, to any crib, play yard, bassinet or cradle.
  2. Always place baby on his/her back on a firm tight fitting mattress with a fitted sheet.
  3. Positioning devices are unnecessary and can also be deadly.
  4. Always keep ALL cords and monitor parts out of the reach of babies and young children – at least 3 feet away.

Safe to Sleep
So consider newer, safer nursery products that are available and take simple steps to place your baby Safe to Sleep®.

 

 

 

Bookmark and Share

This address for this post is: http://www.cpsc.gov/onsafety/2014/12/new-safety-standards-to-keep-your-new-baby-safer-in-the-new-year/

Anchor It and Protect a Child

Blog en español

The Tragic Truth

In December 2012, we posted an OnSafety blog, warning of furniture, television and appliance-related tip-over incidents. At that time, CPSC reported nearly 350 deaths, most involving young children. Since then, more than 80 people have died when a dresser, TV, bookcase, table, appliance or other large item tipped over and fell on them. A new report from our staff indicates that 430 tragic deaths occurred between 2000 and 2013, and an estimated 38,000 annual injuries, many of which were serious, from 2011 through 2013.

In most of the incidents, a child was crushed by the product or struck on the head by the product. What is remarkable is the number of families who have turned tragedy into advocacy.  Jackie Collas, a Philadelphia-area resident, is using social media to honor her son, Curren, and encourage parents to anchor their furniture.  Lisa Seifert of Chicago created Shane’s Foundation to honor her precious son and to increase awareness, education and safety [www.shanesfoundation.org/SafetyInYourHome.html].

The Good News

anchor

By anchoring large furniture, televisions and appliances, these terrible tragedies can be prevented.  As we say at CPSC, “Anchor it and Protect a Child.”

An Internet search of “anti-tip brackets” resulted in dozens of inexpensive options for consumers to anchor furniture, televisions and appliances. Prices for the devices range in price from $5 to $20. These devices are easy to install and unobtrusive. Most anti-tip brackets have some type of quick-release feature that allows homeowners to move furniture temporarily for cleaning or other maintenance.

New furniture, TVs, and appliances often come with an anti-tip device. When making a purchase, ask your salesperson before you leave the store about how to anchor the item.

The Next Step

When you get the new items home, install anchoring devices right away. When installing a new TV, CPSC recommends that you anchor not only the TV, but also the stand, bureau or dresser on which the TV sits. Secure the TV to the base product, and secure the base product to the wall.

Now that your new TV is anchored, where are you going to put the old TV? According to our new study, about 45 percent of tip-over fatalities involving a television occur in bedrooms.

So, if you’re planning to move the old box television into your child’s bedroom or into the family room, consider that statistic—and then think, plan, and decide how to prevent a tip-over incident. Place the television on a base that is appropriate for the size, weight, and width of the television.  Anchor the television to the base and anchor both items to the wall to avoid a tip-over incident.

Children like to climb. In fact, about one-third of child fatalities involving a television occur when children climb onto the stand or dresser holding the TV. The children are often trying to reach a remote control, toy, juice box or some other item. Keep items like these, away from where children will try to climb and access them. If you have young children, the best idea may be to leave that old television on the floor.

Do you have a rental agreement or home design that prevents wall anchoring? Anchor the television to a low, sturdy base, as far back on the base as possible.

Bookmark and Share

This address for this post is: http://www.cpsc.gov/onsafety/2014/09/anchor-it-and-protect-a-child/

Who’s looking after baby?

Blog en español

As parents and caregivers, keeping your baby safe is always your number one priority.baby

Pediatricians are available for great advice on the health and safety of our babies including fevers, feedings, diaper rash and even car seat safety!

There are also additional sources available when it comes to the safety of our babies that you may not always think of.

There are three federal agencies responsible for keeping the most vulnerable bundles of joy safe along with our health professionals.

Federal partners—the Eunice Kennedy Shriver National Institute of Child Health and Human Development (NICHD) of the National Institutes of Health (NIH), Health Resources and Services Administration (HRSA), and the Consumer Product Safety Commission (CPSC) – have been working for decades to reduce infant deaths and injuries and keep babies safe.

SafeToSleep---LOGO1

The Safe to Sleep® campaign, led by NICHD, in collaboration with HRSA and several other organizations and in partnership with CPSC, has a wealth of downloadable resources for creating a safe space for babies and reducing the risk of SIDS and other sleep-related causes of infant death.

Our three agencies all recommend that babies 1) be placed on their back to sleep, 2) the sleep environment be kept free of clutter that can cause suffocation, such as pillows, quilts, comforters, and cushions; and 3) be placed to sleep in a crib, bassinet, or play yard that meet new and stronger safety standards.

These Safe to Sleep® materials can be shared with other parents, caregivers, grandparents, and health and child care providers.

Check out http://safetosleep.nichd.nih.gov for more Safe to Sleep® resources.

Find out more about baby product safety recalls and updates to nursery product standards at www.cpsc.gov/cribs.

Finally, learn more about resources available for your community including health and child care providers at www.hrsa.gov.

Together, we CAN keep baby safe.

NIHNICHDHRSA

Bookmark and Share

This address for this post is: http://www.cpsc.gov/onsafety/2014/09/whos-looking-after-baby/