OnSafety is the Official Blog Site of the U.S. Consumer Product Safety Commission. Here you'll find the latest safety information as well as important messages that will keep you and your family safe. We hope you'll visit often!

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Millions More IKEA Children’s Lamps Recalled

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Did you buy a children’s wall-mounted lamp or nightlight from IKEA? So did a lot of people. Take some time today to see if your child’s light is recalled.

IKEA is recalling about 3.5 million lamps in the U.S., 1.4 million in Canada and 30.2 million worldwide. Children can get tangled and strangle in the electrical cord that hangs from the lamp.

IKEA previously recalled some of these lamps in December 2013. As we reported then, two children, a 16-month-old and a 15-month-old, got tangled in the lamp’s cord while the children were in their cribs. One child died, the other nearly strangled. In both of these instances, which happened in Europe, the children pulled the lamp cords into the crib.

Twenty seven styles of lamps and nightlights are included in the IKEA lamp recall expansion. Here are some of them:

different models of recalled IKEA children's lamps

Take down these lamps until you get and install the free repair kit from IKEA. The repair kit includes self-adhesive fasteners to attach the lamp’s cord to the wall. Here’s IKEA’s contact information:

  • Toll-free phone: (888) 966-4532 anytime
  • Online at www.ikea-usa.com and click on the Recall link at the top of the page for more information.
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This address for this post is: http://www.cpsc.gov/onsafety/2014/04/millions-more-ikea-childrens-lamps-recalled/

Military Families: Know Your Hidden Hazards

The safety of military children should not be sacrificed at home

CPSC joins the Department of Defense (DoD) in supporting military children and recognizing the sacrifices they and their parents make. At CPSC, we want military families to be aware of the hidden hazards that can pose safety risks in military housing. CPSC believes that the safety of military kids should not be sacrificed while in the comfort of their homes. During the DoD’s Month of the Military Child, CPSC urges military families to set aside some time to learn how to prevent tragedies that have taken the lives of too many young children:

Unintentional Poisoning: Reduce the risk of unintentional poisoning in your homes by thinking outside the box and beyond medicine and kitchen cabinets.

Furniture and Appliance Tip-Over: Take simple, low-cost steps to prevent tip-overs of furniture, TVs and appliances.  As we say, “Anchor It and Protect A Child.”

Strangulation: Go cordless with your window blinds and shades to prevent cord strangulations.

Falls from Windows: Always keep in mind that window screens will keep bugs out, but won’t keep children in.

In-Home Drowning: Be aware that children can drown quickly and silently in containers of water inside the home as well as in outdoor pools.

Also, make sure you are using children’s products — like cribs, play yards and strollers — that meet up-to-date safety requirements.

Kids, especially children in military families, have to adapt to a lot of things while growing up. No matter whether you live on or off base, we encourage you to take the simple steps that can prevent these home hazards from hurting your child.

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This address for this post is: http://www.cpsc.gov/onsafety/2014/04/military-families-know-your-hidden-hazards/

Expansion Recall of Rechargeable Batteries Used in Summer Infant Video Monitors

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You may have missed the first notice, but if you use a Summer Infant video baby monitor, be sure to check your nursery to see if you have one of the models with the recalled rechargeable batteries. This recall has been expanded to include an additional 740,000 units and there have been additional incident reports. The monitor’s rechargeable batteries can overheat, cause burns or even property damage.

Today’s announcement from CPSC and Summer Infant includes more than 20 models of Summer Infant handheld color video monitors. Check the recall for specific model and date codes included.

Summer Infant video baby monitor and warning label

Summer Infant is providing a postage paid envelope to return the batteries in exchange for a free replacement battery.

Stop using the video monitors immediately, remove the batteries and contact Summer Infant at (800) 426-8627 to get the free replacement battery. The monitor can continue to be used on AC power with the power cord. Help get the word out about the recall and encourage caregivers, grandparents and child care centers to take advantage of the recall remedy.

We’re also reminding you that you can get direct email notification about product recall announcements on CPSC’s email subscription page.

As for those traditional baby monitor cords, we urge you to keep these cords at least 3 feet away from your baby’s crib to avoid a strangulation hazard. Here’s a video that shows why:

 

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This address for this post is: http://www.cpsc.gov/onsafety/2014/04/expansion-recall-of-rechargeable-batteries-used-in-summer-infant-video-monitors/

Liquid Laundry Packets: An Update

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single-use liquid laundry packetsAbout a year and a half ago, we began warning you about dangers connected to single-load liquid laundry packets. These packets are filled with highly concentrated, toxic chemicals. A 7-month-old in Florida died from swallowing the soap.

CPSC has received about 1,230 reports of children unintentionally injuring themselves with packets. Injuries include swallowing the detergent and getting the chemical in their eyes or on their skin. The Poison Help Line reports even more: Nearly 17,500.

Several companies that make these packets—Cot ‘n Wash, Dial, Procter & Gamble, and Sun Products—have agreed to make some changes to begin addressing these safety concerns. We want you to know about these changes, as CPSC was a driving force in making them happen. Importantly, though, we believe more must be done, and we’re continuing to call on companies to build more safety into these products more quickly and more robustly.

child warning label that appears on packages.Here are some of the changes so far:

Safety standards: Makers and sellers of laundry packets have come together, along with consumer advocates and CPSC staff, to start the process of creating a voluntary consensus standard. ASTM International, a standards setting organization, is overseeing this process. The goal is for all of the members to work together, as quickly as possible, to craft a strong safety standard that meaningfully protects children from these products.

Opaque packaging: Part of the allure of these packets for young children is that they can look like familiar items such as candy, toys and teething products. Companies have changed the containers that hold the packets to be opaque.

Labels and Warnings: “Keep Out of Reach of Children” and “Keep Contents Out of Eyes” safety warning stickers and graphics have been placed in multiple places on the containers. Also, look for posters and other warnings near laundry packets in stores. Warning labels alone are not the answer, but are part of a larger system of safety.

In addition, companies are researching a switch to containers that are more difficult for children to open. Safety latches—both on containers and on cabinets—can be a deterrent to children getting access to these packets. As with all household cleaning products, make sure to keep these packets tightly closed in the original containers and out of sight and out of reach of young children.

These companies also report that they are researching chemical formulations of the laundry detergent in the packets, with the goal to find formulations that remain effective, but are less toxic.

Our hope is that these first steps for these products make them safer and that all companies that make liquid laundry packets will join these safety efforts.

Follow these safety tips if you use these products in your home:

  • Do not let children handle laundry packets
  • Do not puncture or take packets apart
  • Do not leave loose packets around – keep them stored securely in the container
  • Store out of a child’s sight and reach in their original containers
  • Keep containers closed and dry
  • Read and follow package warnings and instructions

Remember, these packets can quickly dissolve upon contact with water, wet hands and saliva. They can also rupture, releasing the chemicals into eyes. If you or your child swallows or is exposed to these chemicals, call Poison Help immediately at (800) 222-1222.

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This address for this post is: http://www.cpsc.gov/onsafety/2014/03/update-liquid-laundry-packets/

Baby Movement Monitor Recall: A Cord Issue

Angelcare Movement and Sound Sensor MonitorWe’ve said it before and we’ll say it again: Kids and cords are a dangerous mix! No matter the product—baby monitors, window coverings, or baby movement monitors —cords in little hands can end up strangling a child.

We’re reminding you because today CPSC, in cooperation with Angelcare Monitors Inc., is announcing a recall to repair movement and sound baby monitors after two deaths. A cord attaches the baby monitor sensor pad under the crib mattress with the nursery monitor unit. This cord poses a strangulation risk if the child pulls the cord into the crib and the cord becomes wrapped around the child’s neck.

Angelcare is providing cord covers for Angelcare Movement and Sound Monitors with Sensor pads. These cord covers are designed to prevent a child from pulling the cord into the crib. Make sure to contact Angelcare at (855)355-2643 or www.angelcarebaby.com to get a free cord cover.

Angelcare Movement and Sound Baby Monitor with rigid strips repair kit installed

Angelcare Movement and Sound Baby Monitor with rigid strips repair kit installed

As for those traditional baby monitor cords, we continue to recommend that you keep these cords and monitors at least 3 feet away from your baby’s crib. Here’s a video that shows why:

 

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This address for this post is: http://www.cpsc.gov/onsafety/2013/11/baby-movement-monitor-recall-a-cord-issue/