OnSafety is the Official Blog Site of the U.S. Consumer Product Safety Commission. Here you'll find the latest safety information as well as important messages that will keep you and your family safe. We hope you'll visit often!

Welcome!

New Children’s Safety Standard: Soft Infant and Toddler Carriers

Blog en español

Mother carrying baby in soft infant carrierCPSC is continuing to make great progress with our child safety work to establish federal safety rules for infant and toddler products. The newest one, which takes effect Sept. 29, 2014, is for soft infant and toddler carriers.

A soft carrier is usually made of sewn fabric and holds a child upright. It is designed to be worn by a caregiver. Soft carriers are typically meant for full-term babies who weigh seven pounds or more through toddlers up to 45 pounds.

The new regulation requires that all new soft infant carriers will be tested to meet safety standards. Some key safety requirements are:

  • Leg openings are designed to prevent an infant from falling through them.
  • The carrier can hold the weight that it’s advertising.
  • The fasteners and straps are designed so that they won’t come apart while a caregiver is holding a child.
  • All soft carriers must contain a warning label about fall and suffocation risks with the product.

CPSC received nearly 125 incident reports—including four deaths—related to soft infant and toddler carriers between January 1999 and July 15, 2013.

Whether your child is placed in a crib, a stroller, or a babywearing product, we want you to have confidence that these products are covered by strong safety standards.

Bookmark and Share

This address for this post is: http://www.cpsc.gov/onsafety/2014/04/new-childrens-safety-standard-soft-infant-and-toddler-carriers/

New Stroller and Carriage Safety Standard: What It Means

Blog en español

Good news, parents! CPSC has approved a new federal safety standard that will improve the safety of all carriages and strollers sold after September 10, 2015.

From January 2008 through June 2013, CPSC staff received about 1,300 safety-related reports for children 4 years old and younger that involved strollers. The numbers, which may change in the future as more reports come into the agency, include:

  • Four deaths
  • 14 hospitalizations
  • Nearly 391 injuries

The new safety standard requires that all strollers and carriages be made, tested and labeled to minimize the hazards seen in the above incidents. These include:

  • Hinge issues that have resulted in pinched, cut, or amputated fingers or arms. These issues have the highest injury rate of all hazards associated with strollers;

  • Broken and detached wheels;
  • Parking brake failures;
  • Locking mechanism problems;
  • Restraint issues, including children being able to unbuckle themselves and broken and loose stroller seat belts;
  • Structural integrity; and
  • Stability

Once the rule takes effect, nearly all strollers sold are required to meet the new requirements. Here are just a few of the stroller types:

Different types of strollers including jogging strollers, double strollers, travel systems, single strollers, umbrella strollers, prams and wagon strollers.

Remember, buckle your child up every time you use the stroller and never leave a child unattended in a stroller. After all, falls are the cause of many injuries associated with strollers.

As Acting Chairman Bob Adler recently said, “I believe it is time that we put a strong mandatory standard in place: A federal standard that helps to ensure that a stroller ride is a safe ride for babies and an equally safe ride for toddlers.”

Bookmark and Share

This address for this post is: http://www.cpsc.gov/onsafety/2014/03/new-stroller-and-carriages-safety-standard-what-it-means/

CPSC Videos: Where to Watch

Have you ever wondered:

  • Can I watch a CPSC Commission briefing about topics such as children’s products or a CPSC public hearing, such as the recent one on hazardous, high powered magnet sets?
  • Are there videos showing recently recalled products?
  • Are there safety videos that I can watch and share on my own website?

The answer to all these questions is YES!

We’ve made some recent upgrades to CPSC.gov to improve your video watching experience. Go to our Newsroom tab to find Videos.  Here’s what you’ll find:

highlights of the video player pages on CPSC.gov

 

Happy viewing!

Bookmark and Share

This address for this post is: http://www.cpsc.gov/onsafety/2013/11/cpsc-videos-where-to-watch/

Play Yards: New Safety Rule to Take Effect

Blog en español

Free Poster: Keep Baby Safe in Play Yard Space

Print and post or share this free poster in English and Spanish.

Beginning Feb. 28, 2013, manufacturers and importers of infant and toddler play yards are required to test their play yards to ensure that they meet new federal safety standards.

Play yards are framed enclosures with a floor and mesh or fabric side panels. Most can be folded for storage or travel.

Play yards that meet the new safety standard must have:

  • Side rails that do not form a sharp V when the product is folded. This prevents a child from strangling in the side rail.
  • Stronger corner brackets to prevent sharp-edged cracks and to prevent a side-rail collapse.
  • Sturdier mattress attachments to the play yard floor to prevent children from getting trapped or hurt.

The new play yard standard is one of many safety standards that CPSC has passed as part of the Danny Keysar Child Product Safety Notification Act, or what we call “Danny’s Law.” Danny Keysar was killed in Chicago in 1998 when a previously recalled play yard in which he was napping collapsed, suffocating him. This new play yard standard was completed in honor of Danny and his family.

In addition to the play yard safety standard, CPSC has issued mandatory safety standards for cribs, children’s bed rails, baby bath seats, baby walkers, infant swings and toddler beds.

CPSC staff is currently working on safety standards for bedside sleepers, hand-held infant carriers,  bassinets, and bassinet attachments to play yards and will propose rules this year for strollers, soft infant carriers and infant slings.

If you use a play yard, keep it bare when you put your baby in it. Each year, CPSC receives reports of infant suffocation deaths. Some key causes of these deaths are the placement of pillows and thick quilts in a baby’s sleeping space and/or overcrowding in the space. Here’s more information on how to put your baby to sleep safely.

Bookmark and Share

This address for this post is: http://www.cpsc.gov/onsafety/2013/02/play-yards-new-safety-rule-to-take-effect/

Magnet Rulemaking: How You Can Be Involved

Blog en español

Updated: Sept. 4, 2012

In late August, CPSC voted to begin rulemaking to address the serious risks posed by hazardous, high-powered magnet sets. You will have 75 days to comment to the agency about the rulemaking. Your comments are due to CPSC by Nov. 19.

CPSC staff briefed the commission about the magnet hazards at an open meeting on Thursday, Aug. 9.

Between 2009 and 2011, our staff estimates that there were 1,700 cases treated in hospital emergency rooms nationwide related to the ingestion of small, high powered magnets. More than 70 percent of these cases involved children between the ages of 4 and 12.

The agency’s staff is proposing a rule that addresses the size and strength of the magnets. Under the proposed rule, magnets that fit in a small parts tester would be required to have a flux index of 50 or less. Many of the high-powered magnets in the sets sold today, by comparison, are many times stronger.

Magnet sets that do not meet the new requirements could not be sold as a manipulative or a desk toy.

CPSC has published a notice of proposed rulemaking in the Federal Register. (FR). Now that the proposed rulemaking has published, your opportunity to comment begins. Here’s where you can share your comments about this proposed rule. Your comments must be submitted by 11:59 p.m. ET on Nov. 19.

Rulemaking comments are submitted through the government website Regulations.gov. We will publicize the Federal Register notice and the link to comment on our website, our @OnSafety Twitter account, and in this blog.

We continue to encourage everyone to read the information on our magnet information page. Watch the video. Keep these magnets away from all children and out of homes with children. For us, it’s about keeping kids safe.

Bookmark and Share

This address for this post is: http://www.cpsc.gov/onsafety/2012/08/magnet-rulemaking-how-you-can-be-involved/