OnSafety is the Official Blog Site of the U.S. Consumer Product Safety Commission. Here you'll find the latest safety information as well as important messages that will keep you and your family safe. We hope you'll visit often!

Welcome!

Home Safe Home for the Holidays

Blog en español

Stitches, slings, and crutches are not what most people envision for the holiday season. Unfortunately, for about 200 people a day, decoration-related injuries are a reality this time of year. During November and December, an estimated 13,000 consumers are treated in emergency rooms for injuries related to holiday lights, Christmas trees, ornaments and other decorations. As consumers nationwide gear up to deck out their homes for the holiday season, CPSC is warning of decorating dangers and providing tips for a safe holiday home.

Holiday ornament

 

Ornaments and Other Decorations – Take special care to avoid sharp, weighted, or breakable decorations. Keep trimmings with small removable parts out of the reach of children, who could swallow or inhale small pieces. Avoid trimmings that resemble candy or food that may tempt a child to reach for and swallow them.

 

 

Holiday candle with poinsettia

 

Candles – Keep burning candles in sight, away from places where kids and pets can reach them or knock them over. Lighted candles should be placed away from items that can catch fire, such as trees, other evergreens, decorations, curtains and furniture.

 

 

Colorful holiday lights

 

 

Holiday Lights – Check lights for the mark of an independent safety testing laboratory.  Examine new and old lights for broken or cracked sockets, frayed or bare wires, or loose connections. Do not use damaged light sets. Read additional tips on holiday lights.

 

 

Decorated Christmas tree and gifts

 

Christmas Trees – Prevent a tree fire. Check for freshness when purchasing a live tree. The needles should be hard to pull from branches and do not break when bent. Preserve the tree while it is in your home by placing it away from heat sources. Each year, there are about 200 fires in which the Christmas tree is the first item ignited. These fires result in an estimated 10 deaths, 20 injuries, and $16 million in property losses.

 

 

Family hanging exterior lights

 

Ladders – Use caution on ladders. Read “Ladder Safety 101” for tips to prevent ladder falls this season.

 

 

 

Baby toys

 

Toys – Play it Safe this holiday season. Avoid toys with small parts for children younger than age 3; purchase toys appropriate for your child’s age by following the age guidelines on the packaging; purchase helmets and other safety gear for ride-on toys; and heed product warnings and care instructions.

 

 

Bookmark and Share

This address for this post is: http://www.cpsc.gov/onsafety/2014/12/home-safe-home-for-the-holidays/

Protect Young Children from Burns on Glass Fronts of Gas Fireplaces—Use Protective Barriers

If you have one of theseGlass front fireplace without screen

 

and one of these in your house,Woman with young boy

you need to hear about a new way to protect the safety of you and your family.

Starting on January 1, 2015, all new gas fireplaces, and fireplace heaters that vent to the outside, will come with a protective barrier.  This barrier will be there to prevent your child and others from coming into direct contact with the glass front of the fireplace.

Gas fireplace screen

 

Why should you care?

Glass front fireplace injury from burn

You should care because the glass fronts of fireplaces can reach 500° F or even 1,000° F, and children and others can be badly burned by touching the glass.

Severe burns can happen in seconds.

 Glass front fireplace injury from burn

Numerous young children have been burned this way. You can prevent this from happening to your child.
Glass front fireplace injury from burn

Protective barriers will be standard on new gas fireplaces starting on January 1.  Make sure to use the barrier.

If you already have a fireplace, buy a protective retrofit barrier to protect your little ones from being burned. Barriers can include attachable safety screens, safety gates and fireplace safety screens like you see below.  If you choose an attachable safety screen, check with your fireplace manufacturer to get the right one for your fireplace. You can buy safety screen barriers at fireplace retailers and hardware stores and purchase safety gates at big box and/or baby product stores.

Gas fireplace screen  Two young children playing in front of a screened off fireplace  Gas fireplace with screen

In addition to the safety barrier, make sure to supervise young children around the fireplace.

We want to thank the Hearth, Patio and Barbeque Association (HPBA), which chaired the voluntary standards committee that developed the new ANSI industry standards requiring barriers. We also want to recognize Dr. Carol Pollack-Nelson, who petitioned CPSC and sparked movement on the voluntary standards to address gas fireplace-related burns to children, and also recognize the American Academy of Pediatrics (AAP) for sharing information with CPSC about the terrible burn injuries children have suffered by touching hot fireplace glass.

The HPBA and AAP have more safety information on their websites. Check them out.

Bookmark and Share

This address for this post is: http://www.cpsc.gov/onsafety/2014/12/protect-young-children-from-burns-on-glass-fronts-of-gas-fireplaces-use-protective-barriers/

Who’s looking after baby?

Blog en español

As parents and caregivers, keeping your baby safe is always your number one priority.baby

Pediatricians are available for great advice on the health and safety of our babies including fevers, feedings, diaper rash and even car seat safety!

There are also additional sources available when it comes to the safety of our babies that you may not always think of.

There are three federal agencies responsible for keeping the most vulnerable bundles of joy safe along with our health professionals.

Federal partners—the Eunice Kennedy Shriver National Institute of Child Health and Human Development (NICHD) of the National Institutes of Health (NIH), Health Resources and Services Administration (HRSA), and the Consumer Product Safety Commission (CPSC) – have been working for decades to reduce infant deaths and injuries and keep babies safe.

SafeToSleep---LOGO1

The Safe to Sleep® campaign, led by NICHD, in collaboration with HRSA and several other organizations and in partnership with CPSC, has a wealth of downloadable resources for creating a safe space for babies and reducing the risk of SIDS and other sleep-related causes of infant death.

Our three agencies all recommend that babies 1) be placed on their back to sleep, 2) the sleep environment be kept free of clutter that can cause suffocation, such as pillows, quilts, comforters, and cushions; and 3) be placed to sleep in a crib, bassinet, or play yard that meet new and stronger safety standards.

These Safe to Sleep® materials can be shared with other parents, caregivers, grandparents, and health and child care providers.

Check out http://safetosleep.nichd.nih.gov for more Safe to Sleep® resources.

Find out more about baby product safety recalls and updates to nursery product standards at www.cpsc.gov/cribs.

Finally, learn more about resources available for your community including health and child care providers at www.hrsa.gov.

Together, we CAN keep baby safe.

NIHNICHDHRSA

Bookmark and Share

This address for this post is: http://www.cpsc.gov/onsafety/2014/09/whos-looking-after-baby/

Millions More IKEA Children’s Lamps Recalled

Blog en español

Did you buy a children’s wall-mounted lamp or nightlight from IKEA? So did a lot of people. Take some time today to see if your child’s light is recalled.

IKEA is recalling about 3.5 million lamps in the U.S., 1.4 million in Canada and 30.2 million worldwide. Children can get tangled and strangle in the electrical cord that hangs from the lamp.

IKEA previously recalled some of these lamps in December 2013. As we reported then, two children, a 16-month-old and a 15-month-old, got tangled in the lamp’s cord while the children were in their cribs. One child died, the other nearly strangled. In both of these instances, which happened in Europe, the children pulled the lamp cords into the crib.

Twenty seven styles of lamps and nightlights are included in the IKEA lamp recall expansion. Here are some of them:

different models of recalled IKEA children's lamps

Take down these lamps until you get and install the free repair kit from IKEA. The repair kit includes self-adhesive fasteners to attach the lamp’s cord to the wall. Here’s IKEA’s contact information:

  • Toll-free phone: (888) 966-4532 anytime
  • Online at www.ikea-usa.com and click on the Recall link at the top of the page for more information.
Bookmark and Share

This address for this post is: http://www.cpsc.gov/onsafety/2014/04/millions-more-ikea-childrens-lamps-recalled/

Military Families: Know Your Hidden Hazards

The safety of military children should not be sacrificed at home

CPSC joins the Department of Defense (DoD) in supporting military children and recognizing the sacrifices they and their parents make. At CPSC, we want military families to be aware of the hidden hazards that can pose safety risks in military housing. CPSC believes that the safety of military kids should not be sacrificed while in the comfort of their homes. During the DoD’s Month of the Military Child, CPSC urges military families to set aside some time to learn how to prevent tragedies that have taken the lives of too many young children:

Unintentional Poisoning: Reduce the risk of unintentional poisoning in your homes by thinking outside the box and beyond medicine and kitchen cabinets.

Furniture and Appliance Tip-Over: Take simple, low-cost steps to prevent tip-overs of furniture, TVs and appliances.  As we say, “Anchor It and Protect A Child.”

Strangulation: Go cordless with your window blinds and shades to prevent cord strangulations.

Falls from Windows: Always keep in mind that window screens will keep bugs out, but won’t keep children in.

In-Home Drowning: Be aware that children can drown quickly and silently in containers of water inside the home as well as in outdoor pools.

Also, make sure you are using children’s products — like cribs, play yards and strollers — that meet up-to-date safety requirements.

Kids, especially children in military families, have to adapt to a lot of things while growing up. No matter whether you live on or off base, we encourage you to take the simple steps that can prevent these home hazards from hurting your child.

Bookmark and Share

This address for this post is: http://www.cpsc.gov/onsafety/2014/04/military-families-know-your-hidden-hazards/