OnSafety is the Official Blog Site of the U.S. Consumer Product Safety Commission. Here you'll find the latest safety information as well as important messages that will keep you and your family safe. We hope you'll visit often!

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IKEA Reporting Child Death Involving Wall-Mounted Lamp; Recall

Do you have these wall-mounted IKEA children’s lamps in your home?

Recalled Ikea children's lamps

IKEA is recalling these lights and supplying you with free self-adhesive fasteners to attach the lamp’s cord to the wall.

Two children, a 16-month-old and a 15-month-old, got tangled in the lamp’s cord while the children were in their cribs. One child died, the other nearly strangled. In both of these instances, the children pulled the lamp cords into the crib.

Take down these lamps until you get and install the free repair kit from IKEA. Here’s IKEA’s contact information:

  • Toll-free phone: (888) 966-4532 anytime
  • Online at www.ikea-usa.com and click on the Recall link at the top of the page for more information.

This recall is the second in the past month involving cords strangling young children. In November, Angelcare announced a recall to repair movement and sound baby monitors after two deaths.  Keep all cords possible at least 3 feet away from your baby’s crib. Here are more @OnSafety blogs explaining various kid/cord issues.

This address for this post is: http://www.cpsc.gov/onsafety/2013/12/ikea-reporting-child-death-involving-wall-mounted-lamp-recall/

Baby Movement Monitor Recall: A Cord Issue

Angelcare Movement and Sound Sensor MonitorWe’ve said it before and we’ll say it again: Kids and cords are a dangerous mix! No matter the product—baby monitors, window coverings, or baby movement monitors —cords in little hands can end up strangling a child.

We’re reminding you because today CPSC, in cooperation with Angelcare Monitors Inc., is announcing a recall to repair movement and sound baby monitors after two deaths. A cord attaches the baby monitor sensor pad under the crib mattress with the nursery monitor unit. This cord poses a strangulation risk if the child pulls the cord into the crib and the cord becomes wrapped around the child’s neck.

Angelcare is providing cord covers for Angelcare Movement and Sound Monitors with Sensor pads. These cord covers are designed to prevent a child from pulling the cord into the crib. Make sure to contact Angelcare at (855)355-2643 or www.angelcarebaby.com to get a free cord cover.

Angelcare Movement and Sound Baby Monitor with rigid strips repair kit installed

Angelcare Movement and Sound Baby Monitor with rigid strips repair kit installed

As for those traditional baby monitor cords, we continue to recommend that you keep these cords and monitors at least 3 feet away from your baby’s crib. Here’s a video that shows why:

 

This address for this post is: http://www.cpsc.gov/onsafety/2013/11/baby-movement-monitor-recall-a-cord-issue/

Window Covering Cords: Don’t Tie Them Up, Get Them Away From Children

Earlier this week, we participated in a #CordSafety Twitter chat. These chats are useful to spread safety advice. Chats also give everyone insight into what parents are doing in their homes. Here’s an important question that was posed in the chat:

Mom It Forward Tweet: Giveaway Question! Please answer the following question: How do you keep cords out of the reach of kids?

The number of people who said they tie up the cords and place them up high surprised us. Here’s a sample of the responses:

  • When my kids were smaller, we tied up the cords to top of the blinds. Revisited often.
  • I tie them up and keep them out reach. From window cords to appliance cords.
  • Answer – rooms with blinds have the cords tied up at the top of the window.
  • I tie them in a loose bow, well out of reach. Keep furniture away, that they could stand on, teach safety

Tie ‘em up is risky. It gives parents a false sense of security. Cords can, and do, get tangled. Sometimes, this happens after parents tie the cords up to childproof the cords.

One child strangles in window cords nearly every month. Kids can easily wrap dangling or accessible cords around their necks and get tangled. Even cords tied up and high can be accessible to young children. There have been incidents of well-intentioned, tied up cords that have ended tragically.

Take a look at our blog on Kids and Cords from 2010. In there, we tell you about parents who regularly tried to tie hanging window covering cords up so that they did not hang down. Dad left his 22-month-old son for about 10 minutes, only to find him strangled in tangled cords.

This incident is not the only tragic tale of the “tie them up” approach. That’s why we recommend the following options for families with young children:

  • Cordless: Self explanatory. This is the safest option.
  • Shades with inaccessible cords: You shouldn’t be able to grab onto a cord in any way.

The top two are the best options. If new window coverings truly aren’t an option in your budget install a retrofit kit. These kits are a short-term fix, especially for mini-blinds made before 2000. Just remember that these kits do not address all the hazards posed by cords.

Exposed cords must be inaccessible to children. Tying them up and/or knotting them up can be dangerous. Look for products that are specifically designed to keep the cords out of sight and reach. If you don’t go cordless now, make the cords in your home inaccessible.

For more information on window covering cord safety, please visit CPSC’s Window Covering Cords Information Center.

 

This address for this post is: http://www.cpsc.gov/onsafety/2013/10/window-covering-cords-dont-tie-them-up-get-them-away-from-children/

Los niños pueden estrangularse en cordones de ventanas

Blog en inglés  Muñeca siendo estrangulada por un cordón de ventana.

¿Viven usted y su familia en una vivienda militar? Inspeccione sus persianas, cortinas romanas y otro tipo de cortinas y persianas. Si ve algún cordón accesible o que cuelga, su hijo(a) corre peligro.

Las cortinas y persianas para ventanas con cuerdas o cordones expuestos son uno de los principales peligros ocultos en hogares. Los niños pueden enredarse un cordón alrededor del cuello fácil y rápidamente o quedar enredados con lazos formados por las cuerdas.

De hecho, casi cada mes muere un niño estrangulado con cordones de ventanas y otro resulta lastimado por lo mismo. Esto puede suceder de forma rápida y silenciosa. Lamentablemente, algunos de los incidentes han ocurrido en viviendas militares. Queremos ayudarlo a usted y a su familia a estar seguros en su hogar.

Por ello, en el Día de la Protección del Consumidor Militar (17 de julio de este año), examine bien sus persianas, cortinas romanas y otro tipo de cortinas y persianas. Busque cordones y cuerdas que formen lazos o estén expuestos. Puede sorprenderse con lo que descubra. Lo que usted haga puede salvar la vida de su hijo(a).

He aquí lo que puede hacer con respecto a la seguridad de sus ventanas.

  • Use persianas o cortinas sin cuerdas o con cordones inaccesibles. Muchas tiendas actualmente venden estos productos.
  • Coloque las cunas, camas y otros muebles lejos de las ventanas, porque los niños pueden subirse a ellos y alcanzar los cordones de las cortinas o persianas.
  • Haga que las cuerdas y los cordones sean inaccesibles, si no puede cambiar sus cortinas y persianas actuales.

Anteriormente, muchos consumidores han usado los kits de reparación proporcionados de forma gratuita por el Consejo de Seguridad de Cortinas para Ventanas (Window Covering Safety Council, WCSC, por su nombre y siglas en inglés) para arreglar cortinas que fueron fabricadas antes de noviembre del 2000. Tenga en cuenta que estos kits no corrigen el peligro que presentan muchas persianas comunes con cordones o cuerdas colgantes.  

Los niños y los cordones son una combinación peligrosa. Por lo tanto, si tiene niños pequeños en su casa, la decisión más segura que Ud. puede tomar es no usar cuerdas ni cordones, o comprar persianas con cordones inaccesibles.

This address for this post is: http://www.cpsc.gov/onsafety/2013/07/los-ninos-pueden-estrangularse-en-cordones-de-ventanas/

Kids Can Strangle in Window Cords

Blog in Spanishbaby doll being strangled by a window cord.

Do you live in military housing with your family?   Take a look at your window blinds or other type of window coverings, including Roman shades.  If you can see any dangling or accessible cords, your child is at risk.

Window coverings with exposed cords are one of the top hidden home hazards.  Kids can easily and quickly wrap the cords around their necks or become entangled in the cord loops.

In fact, one child strangles in window cords nearly every month and another child is hurt.  This can happen quickly and silently.  Sadly, some of the incidents occurred in military housing. We want to help you and your family to be safe and secure in your home.

So, on Military Consumer Protection Day (July 17 this year), examine your window blinds, curtains and shades closely. Look for exposed, looped cords. What you find may surprise you.  What you do about it can save your child’s life.

Here is how you can safeguard your windows.

  • Use cordless blinds or go with blinds or shades that have inaccessible cords. Many stores have these products available for purchase right now.

 

  • Move cribs, beds, and furniture away from windows, because children can climb on them and reach the cords on the window coverings.

 

  • Make loose cords inaccessible, if you are unable to replace older blinds and shades.

In the past, many consumers have used free repair kits from the Window Covering Safety Council (WCSC) to fix their blinds that were made before November 2000.  Keep in mind that these kits do not get rid of the dangling pull cord hazard with many common window blinds.

Kids and cords are a dangerous combination. So, if you have young children in your house, your safest approach is to go cordless or buy blinds with inaccessible cords.

This address for this post is: http://www.cpsc.gov/onsafety/2013/07/kids-can-strangle-in-window-cords/