OnSafety is the Official Blog Site of the U.S. Consumer Product Safety Commission. Here you'll find the latest safety information as well as important messages that will keep you and your family safe. We hope you'll visit often!

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Do Passengers Play a Role When an ATV Rolls?

Ever carried a passenger on a one-seater ATV or been a passenger on one? Ever been in a crash with a passenger on board or been a passenger in an ATV accident?

Researchers at CPSC know that carrying a passenger on a one-person ATV creates a hazard. We want to reduce this hazard, but CPSC needs your help. Our researchers want to know more about fatal and non-fatal ATV crashes and the role of passengers.

A recent CPSC study found interesting evidence about age, gender and location of ATV riders involved in reported, fatal ATV accidents. Although the study was not able to identify a significant relationship between the number of ATV passengers and the chances of overturning, the most conclusive finding was that more information is needed.

That is why we seek your input and have issued a request for information (RFI) to expand the data we have about passengers on ATVs.  The information you provide can help us as we try to determine how we might reduce ATV hazards.

You can find more details about the RFI and how to submit information at www.federalregister.gov. The comment period closes on November 24, 2014.

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This address for this post is: http://www.cpsc.gov/onsafety/2014/10/do-passengers-play-a-role-when-an-atv-rolls/

Anchor It and Protect a Child

Blog en español

The Tragic Truth

In December 2012, we posted an OnSafety blog, warning of furniture, television and appliance-related tip-over incidents. At that time, CPSC reported nearly 350 deaths, most involving young children. Since then, more than 80 people have died when a dresser, TV, bookcase, table, appliance or other large item tipped over and fell on them. A new report from our staff indicates that 430 tragic deaths occurred between 2000 and 2013, and an estimated 38,000 annual injuries, many of which were serious, from 2011 through 2013.

In most of the incidents, a child was crushed by the product or struck on the head by the product. What is remarkable is the number of families who have turned tragedy into advocacy.  Jackie Collas, a Philadelphia-area resident, is using social media to honor her son, Curren, and encourage parents to anchor their furniture.  Lisa Seifert of Chicago created Shane’s Foundation to honor her precious son and to increase awareness, education and safety [www.shanesfoundation.org/SafetyInYourHome.html].

The Good News

anchor

By anchoring large furniture, televisions and appliances, these terrible tragedies can be prevented.  As we say at CPSC, “Anchor it and Protect a Child.”

An Internet search of “anti-tip brackets” resulted in dozens of inexpensive options for consumers to anchor furniture, televisions and appliances. Prices for the devices range in price from $5 to $20. These devices are easy to install and unobtrusive. Most anti-tip brackets have some type of quick-release feature that allows homeowners to move furniture temporarily for cleaning or other maintenance.

New furniture, TVs, and appliances often come with an anti-tip device. When making a purchase, ask your salesperson before you leave the store about how to anchor the item.

The Next Step

When you get the new items home, install anchoring devices right away. When installing a new TV, CPSC recommends that you anchor not only the TV, but also the stand, bureau or dresser on which the TV sits. Secure the TV to the base product, and secure the base product to the wall.

Now that your new TV is anchored, where are you going to put the old TV? According to our new study, about 45 percent of tip-over fatalities involving a television occur in bedrooms.

So, if you’re planning to move the old box television into your child’s bedroom or into the family room, consider that statistic—and then think, plan, and decide how to prevent a tip-over incident. Place the television on a base that is appropriate for the size, weight, and width of the television.  Anchor the television to the base and anchor both items to the wall to avoid a tip-over incident.

Children like to climb. In fact, about one-third of child fatalities involving a television occur when children climb onto the stand or dresser holding the TV. The children are often trying to reach a remote control, toy, juice box or some other item. Keep items like these, away from where children will try to climb and access them. If you have young children, the best idea may be to leave that old television on the floor.

Do you have a rental agreement or home design that prevents wall anchoring? Anchor the television to a low, sturdy base, as far back on the base as possible.

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This address for this post is: http://www.cpsc.gov/onsafety/2014/09/anchor-it-and-protect-a-child/

Who’s looking after baby?

Blog en español

As parents and caregivers, keeping your baby safe is always your number one priority.baby

Pediatricians are available for great advice on the health and safety of our babies including fevers, feedings, diaper rash and even car seat safety!

There are also additional sources available when it comes to the safety of our babies that you may not always think of.

There are three federal agencies responsible for keeping the most vulnerable bundles of joy safe along with our health professionals.

Federal partners—the Eunice Kennedy Shriver National Institute of Child Health and Human Development (NICHD) of the National Institutes of Health (NIH), Health Resources and Services Administration (HRSA), and the Consumer Product Safety Commission (CPSC) – have been working for decades to reduce infant deaths and injuries and keep babies safe.

SafeToSleep---LOGO1

The Safe to Sleep® campaign, led by NICHD, in collaboration with HRSA and several other organizations and in partnership with CPSC, has a wealth of downloadable resources for creating a safe space for babies and reducing the risk of SIDS and other sleep-related causes of infant death.

Our three agencies all recommend that babies 1) be placed on their back to sleep, 2) the sleep environment be kept free of clutter that can cause suffocation, such as pillows, quilts, comforters, and cushions; and 3) be placed to sleep in a crib, bassinet, or play yard that meet new and stronger safety standards.

These Safe to Sleep® materials can be shared with other parents, caregivers, grandparents, and health and child care providers.

Check out http://safetosleep.nichd.nih.gov for more Safe to Sleep® resources.

Find out more about baby product safety recalls and updates to nursery product standards at www.cpsc.gov/cribs.

Finally, learn more about resources available for your community including health and child care providers at www.hrsa.gov.

Together, we CAN keep baby safe.

NIHNICHDHRSA

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This address for this post is: http://www.cpsc.gov/onsafety/2014/09/whos-looking-after-baby/

2014 CPSC Chairman’s Circle of Commendation Award

Nominations Deadline Extended

This fall, CPSC will honor individuals, businesses and organizations that have made significant contributions to improving consumer product safety.

The deadline to NOMINATE them for a CPSC Chairman’s Circle of Commendation Award has been extended to September 30, 2014.

Nomination forms and details about the award and previous winners are available at www.cpsc.gov/award .

Send your nomination to:

Chairman’s Circle of Commendation Award

U.S. Consumer Product Safety Commission

4330 East West Highway, Suite 725

Bethesda, MD 20814

Nominations can also be submitted by e-mail to chairmansaward@cpsc.gov.

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This address for this post is: http://www.cpsc.gov/onsafety/2014/09/2014-cpsc-chairmans-circle-of-commendation-award/

First Ever CPSC+EC Product Safety Training for Buyers and Sourcing Professionals in China

Buyers-Training-Blog

Participants at Product Safety Seminar

Here at CPSC, we are always looking for new ways to collaborate with our partners and improve the safety of imports that are headed for the stores that you shop in.  On Aug. 29, Sept. 1, and Sept. 2, CPSC and the European Commission Directorate-General for Enterprise and Industry (DG Enterprise) conducted in China the first-ever training events specifically designed for buyers and sourcing professionals.  These training events are for the individuals who make vital decisions on products to be exported to the United States and Europe.

Company representatives who buy consumer products destined for retail sale are the key decision makers at the intersection of the production, supply and retail chains.  They have the power to ensure that products purchased for their companies meet all U.S. and European safety requirements.  Too often, they may lack the information to fulfill this role and that lack of information could impact the safety of you and your family.  CPSC / DG Enterprise product safety buyer training aims to help fill that gap.

In each of three different manufacturing centers in China—Shanghai, Guangzhou, and Shunde—product safety staff from the CPSC and DG Enterprise taught a one-day seminar (with simultaneous interpretation) for buyers and sourcing professionals, who procure consumer products for export to China’s two biggest foreign consumer markets.  Beginning with a session covering general product safety information from both jurisdictions, attendees moved into more specific training sessions covering safety requirements for toys, apparel, and electrical products.  These three categories represent products for the most vulnerable consumers or products that too often present a risk of injury or death.

The U.S. Chamber of Commerce in China (AmCham) hosted the training events.  More information is available here.

Our goal is for companies to use this training opportunity to empower their buyers to identify and prevent safety problems in the production and supply of products.  Failure to take a proactive approach could lead to a product seizure or recall.  It is good for business and good for the customer when buyers take safety to the source.

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This address for this post is: http://www.cpsc.gov/onsafety/2014/09/first-ever-cpscec-product-safety-training-for-buyers-and-sourcing-professionals-in-china/