Choking Hazard Prompts Recall Of Crib Toys, Dolls

FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE  
March 14, 1989  
Release # 89-020
 

Choking Hazard Prompts Recall Of Crib Toys, Dolls

WASHINGTON-- Two crib toys and small dolls sold nationwide in toy stores last year under the "Blue Box" label are being voluntarily recalled by Norman J. Lewis Associates, New York, N.Y., because small parts of the toys may present choking hazards to young children.

Recalled by the company:

- "Crib Activity Play Doggie," a plastic crib toy which attaches to a crib or playpen railing with fabric straps. Molded in the shape of a dog dressed in coat and tie, the 12-inch flat toy has dials and knobs for the infant to push and pull as well as a detachable horn and telephone receiver. Small pieces of the horn and phone receiver may break apart and could present choking hazards for young children. "BLUE BOX MADE IN SINGAPORE" is imprinted on the back of the crib toy. Approximately 21,000 were sold last year.

- "Play Mirror" is another plastic crib toy which attaches to a crib or playpen with fabric straps. The 11-inch mirror is framed in yellow plastic; dials, rings and a cylinder are located on the bottom of the frame. Pieces of plastic may break off the toy and could present choking hazards for young children. "BLUE BOX" is imprinted on the upper left corner of the frame. Approximately 37,000 play mirrors were sold last year.

- "Sweet Heart Babies" are four-inch, plastic female dolls with rooted hair, painted eyes and jointed arms and legs. The dolls are wearing one piece of clothing. The doll's arms and legs can be pulled off and could be a choking hazard to young children. "CHINA" is imprinted on the doll's back. Approximately 190,000 were sold in sets of six dolls in clear plastic packaging.

While no injuries have been reported to the company or to the U. S. Consumer Product Safety Commission (CPSC), parents should immediately take the toys away from young children and return them to the store where purchased for a refund of the full purchase price.

U.S. Customs Service identified the toys during the "Operation Toyland" surveillance program conducted with CPSC last year, at-the Ports of Charlotte, Philadelphia, and Seattle.